Top 25 Baseball Stories of 2016 — #12: Tim Tebow plays baseball

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We’re a few short days away from 2017 so it’s a good time to look back at the top 25 baseball stories of 2016. Some of them took place on the field, some of them off the field and some of them were creatures of social media, fan chatter and the like. No matter where the story broke, however, these were the stories baseball fans were talking about most this past year.

It seems like it lasted all season, but the “Tim Tebow: Baseball Player” thing didn’t get started until early August. That’s when the former Heisman Trophy winner and failed NFL quarterback announced that he was “actively pursuing a career in professional baseball” and that he planned to hold a workout for MLB teams. Tebow is 29 and hadn’t played baseball since he was a junior in high school. As such, the entire thing was viewed as a publicity stunt. Some in baseball were particularly unimpressed by Tebow’s intentions.

Whatever his intentions were and are, Tebow followed through. At least he did after selling some autographed baseball merchandise from his website, as one does. At the end of August, however, he held a workout for scouts. His raw power was, not surprisingly, excellent. Everything else was found lacking. A little over a week later the defending NL champion New York Mets nonetheless signed him. They intended to send him to the Instructional League, but allowed him to take weekends off in order to work his day job as an ESPN college football analyst. The Mets didn’t much care, however, as they were selling a lot of Tim Tebow jerseys themselves.

A hurricane cut Tebow’s Instructional League stint short, but the Mets had bigger plans for their new star: The Arizona Fall League. This rankled many more in baseball than his signing did. The AFL is for serious prospects and Tebow, however nice a guy he may be, is not a serious prospect. On to Arizona he went, however. Apart from some typical Tim Tebow off-the-field heroics it didn’t go well. His very presence in the Fall League was viewed as a “farce,” and the scouts’ assessments of his game was withering. He was called “awful,” was told that he “stinks” and that his game was “ugly.”  The man may have big league dreams, but he had no business in the Fall League.

Not that this has deterred the Mets. They plan to let him play in spring training games next March. They pretty much have to, right? If they don’t, Tebow will have to take the $300 autographed Mets jersey he’s selling off of his website. And that would simply be embarrassing.

 

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.