Will Trump’s immigration policies impact Latin American players?

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Everyone is all “stick to sports” until politics deprive their favorite team of a shortstop.

OK, sure, that’s a flip way of putting it, but today Derrick Goold of the Post-Dispatch asks a legitimate question for Major League Baseball in the wake of Donald Trump’s election: will his inevitable changes to U.S. immigration policy impact the market for international players?

The election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States leaves baseball, more than any other professional sport, to consider what the immigration policies he proposed during the campaign could mean for acquiring talent. The President-elect and his running mate, Vice President-elect Mike Pence, have both argued for tighter restrictions on immigration from Mexico. Trump pledged to build a wall between the two countries. He and Pence have both said at various times during the campaign that they would outright undo Obama’s push to normalizing relationships with Cuba, or rethink the approach.

Goold talks to agents and executives about it and they are, understandably, not offering much in the way of strong opinion yet. There’s a lot of uncertainty about a lot of Trump policies — he was not terribly detail-oriented when it came to specific laws he’d propose — and, of course, Major League Baseball has always tried to stay friendly with whatever administration is in power, so no one is going to rock the boat a couple of days after an election.

Still, it’s a question worth asking. While Trump’s immigration position has stressed crackdowns on illegal immigration, the implementation of new laws and regulations always brings with it unexpected consequences. Most ballplayers from other countries get work visas to play here, but what happens if a player gets a DUI in the Dominican Republic and a tough new regulation dealing with immigrants with criminal records takes effect? Could a player who never had trouble getting into the United States for the baseball season before face new hurdles?

And what of asylum matters? It seems likely that new scrutiny will be exerted there as, in all cases, we can assume that the laws will get tougher, not looser. A few years ago Wilson Ramos was kidnapped in Venezuela and, afterward, moved his entire family to the United States for their safety. Could a player do so if it happened in 2018 and the laws have changed? And what of players who have never before been here? Maybe someone who broke in five years ago is immune, but are new visa applicants going to face tougher restrictions?

There are a lot of changes coming to the United States after Donal Trump is sworn into office. Some of them will have an impact on baseball. The question Derrick Goold asks in this article is a good one.

UPDATE: To those of you who are saying that Trump’s policies only cover “illegals,” know that that is simply not true. He is proposing a tightening of visa-issuance and proposes to eliminate the family provisions of immigration/visa/asylum rules, the sort of which allows Venezuelan players to bring their familes here.

Rather than just say “that’s not what Trump meant” in response, take the president-elect at his word.

Bogaerts reportedly heading to the Padres for 11 years, $280 million

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SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Padres and Xander Bogaerts agreed to a blockbuster $280 million, 11-year contract Wednesday night, adding the All-Star slugger to an already deep lineup.

A person familiar with the negotiations confirmed the contract to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because it was pending a physical.

The Padres already had Fernando Tatis Jr. at shortstop, but he missed the entire season because of injuries and an 80-game suspension for testing positive for a performance-enhancing drug.

San Diego also met with Aaron Judge and Trea Turner before the big stars opted for different teams. The Padres reached the NL Championship Series this year before losing to the Phillies.

“From our standpoint, you want to explore and make sure we’re looking at every possible opportunity to get better,” general manager A.J. Preller said before the Bogaerts deal surfaced. “We’ve got a real desire to win and do it for a long time.”

The 30-year-old Bogaerts was one of the headliners in a stellar group of free-agent shortstops that also included Turner, Carlos Correa and Dansby Swanson.

Bogaerts, who’s from Aruba, terminated his $120 million, six-year contract with Boston after the season. The four-time All-Star forfeited salaries of $20 million for each of the next three years after hitting .307 with 15 homers and 73 RBIs in 150 games.

Bogaerts is a .292 hitter with 156 homers and 683 RBIs in 10 big league seasons – all with Boston. He helped the Red Sox win the World Series in 2013 and 2018.

Bogaerts becomes the latest veteran hitter to depart Boston after the Red Sox traded Mookie Betts to the Los Angeles Dodgers in February 2020. Rafael Devers has one more year of arbitration eligibility before he can hit the market.

Bogaerts had his best big league season in 2019, batting .309 with a career-best 33 homers and 117 RBIs. He had 23 homers and 103 RBIs in 2018.

In 44 postseason games, Bogaerts is a .231 hitter with five homers and 16 RBIs.