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Montero’s pinch-hit grand slam lifts Cubs 1-0 in NLCS

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This is the stuff of October baseball. This is the kind of postseason turmoil and triumph that generates the narratives we’ll repeat over and over to our children and our children’s children and our children’s children’s cats for years to come.

We’ll start with Kenta Maeda‘s command issues against the top of the Dodgers’ order, when he centered two fastballs in the strike zone and left them susceptible to Dexter Fowler‘s .276 average and Kris Bryant‘s .554 slugging percentage as the two sluggers combined to bring home the first run of the night. At their urging, we’ll briefly mention Maeda’s first postseason single in the top of the second inning, ripped off of a Jon Lester heater and wasted as Adrian Gonzalez was tagged out at home for the last out, then we’ll skip to the bottom of the second inning and Jason Heyward‘s leadoff triple.

We’ll tell them about Javier Baez, he of the .974 postseason OPS, and how he parked a slider in center field to score Heyward, then dashed for third base on a wild pitch to Jon Lester. When Lester moved to bunt, Baez raced home to startle Dodgers’ catcher Carlos Ruiz a second before the throw reached the bag. We’ll touch on Lester’s four consecutive shutout frames, then drop the bomb: an Andre Ethier home run in the fifth, skied to left center field to bring the Dodgers within two runs of tying the game.

And then, we’ll say, leaning in a little closer and speaking just a little more quietly, this is where gets good. After back-to-back scoreless innings in the sixth and seventh, with nary a run between the two teams, the Dodgers loaded the bases against right-hander Pedro Strop. The Cubs brought in Aroldis Chapman; the Dodgers, Corey Seager. Seager went down on four pitches, as did Yasiel Puig. With two outs, Adrian Gonzalez lashed the first 101-m.p.h. fastball he saw for a base hit, driving in two runs and promptly stealing second base before Yasmani Grandal grounded out to strand the go-ahead run.

In the bottom of the frame, with the Dodgers and Cubs knotted 3-3, Los Angeles’ right-hander Joe Blanton surrendered a leadoff double to Ben Zobrist, then intentionally walked Jason Heyward and Chris Coghlan to get to the pitcher’s spot in the lineup. Joe Maddon pulled Chapman for backup catcher and pinch-hitter Miguel Montero, who swung through two strikes to get to the perfect pitch, a 0-2 slider that landed deep in the right field bleachers for the first go-ahead, pinch-hit grand slam in postseason history.

Maybe we’ll polish off the story with the tale of Dexter Fowler solo shot that trailed Montero’s blast, or the way Hector Rondon gave up a run while trying to close out the ninth inning. Maybe, though, we’ll just leave them with this one flawless moment instead.

The Players’ Weekend uniforms are terrible

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The Yankees and the Dodgers have a storied World Series history, having met in the Fall Classic 11 times. Part of what made those falls so classic was the livery worn by each club.

The Yankees’ uniforms have gone unchanged since 1936. The Dodgers, though changing cities in 1958, have had the same basic, classic look with only minor derivations for almost as long. You can’t even say the names of these teams without picturing pinstripes, those red Dodgers numbers, both teams’ clean road grays, the Yankees navy and the Dodgers’ Dodger blue.

They looked like a couple of expansion teams last night however, at least sartorially speaking.

As you probably know it’s Players’ Weekend this weekend, and teams all over the league wore either all black or all white with player-chosen nicknames on the back. We’ve had the nicknames for a couple of years now and that’s fine, but the black and white combo is new. It doesn’t look great, frankly. I riffed on that on Twitter yesterday a good bit. But beyond my mere distaste for the ensembles, they present a pretty problematic palette, too.

For one thing the guys in black blend in with the umpires. Quick, look at these infields and tell me who’s playing and who’s officiating:

The white batting helmets look especially bad:

But some guys — like Enrique Hernandez of the Dodgers, realized that pine tar makes the white helmets look super special:

There was also a general issue with the white-on-white uniforms in that it’s rather hard to read the names and the numbers on the backs of the jerseys. This was especially true during the Cubs-Nationals game in the afternoon sunlight. You’ll note this as a much bigger problem on Sunday. It’s all rather ironic, of course, that the players have been given the right to put fun, quirky nicknames on the backs of their jerseys but no one can really see them.

The SNY booth was reading many people’s minds last night, noting how much Mad Magazine “Spy vs. Spy” energy this is throwing off:

I’ll also note that if you’re flipping between games or looking at highlights on social media it’s super hard to even tell which team is which — and even what game’s highlights you’re seeing — just by looking which, you know, is sort of the point of having uniforms in the first place.

I’m glad the players have a weekend in which they’re allowed to wear what they want. I just wish they’d wear something better.