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Nationals take 2-1 NLDS lead with 8-3 win over the Dodgers in Game 3

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The Nationals rallied for four runs in the third inning against Dodgers starter Kenta Maeda and scored four more in the ninth against closer Kenley Jansen, helping them win 8-3 and take a 2-1 NLDS series lead on Monday afternoon at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles.

The Dodgers opened the scoring in the bottom of the first with Justin Turner drawing a one-out walk and promptly scoring on a Corey Seager double off of starter Gio Gonzalez. That would be it for offense for the Dodgers until the fifth.

In the third, Trea Turner led off with a single. Jayson Werth followed up with a double to right field. Outfielder Yasiel Puig made a strong throw home, but Turner’s speed was too much, allowing him to score. Werth went to third base on the throw. After Daniel Murphy flied out, Bryce Harper singled Werth home. Harper then stole second base and went to third on a throwing error by catcher Yasmani Grandal. Anthony Rendon then cranked out a two-run homer to left field, making it a 4-1 game.

In the fifth, the Dodgers clawed back into the game. Joc Pederson hit a one-out single. Carlos Ruiz pinch-hit for reliever Pedro Baez and jacked a two-run shot to left field, closing the gap to 4-3.

From there, however, the Nationals’ bullpen was too good for the Dodgers to overcome. Sammy Solis got five outs without allowing a run. Oliver Perez got one, and Shawn Kelly got five to bridge the gap to closer Mark Melancon.

The Nationals gave closer Mark Melancon plenty of cushion in the bottom of the ninth. Jayson Werth blasted a solo home run off of Jansen to push the lead to 5-3. Jansen then walked Murphy, hit Harper with a pitch, then allowed both to score on a one-out Ryan Zimmerman double to right field, making it a 7-3 game. Ross Stripling came in to relieve Jansen but yielded a sacrifice fly to Chris Heisey, pushing the lead to 8-3. A one-run lead became five in a matter of about 10 minutes.

Melancon got Grandal to fly out for the first out of the bottom of the ninth. Josh Reddick then grounded out and Pederson flied out to left to end the game, sealing the 8-3 victory for the Nationals. The Nationals will look to clinch the NLDS at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday at 5:00 PM EDT. The Nationals have yet to name a starter, but whoever it is, he will oppose the Dodgers’ Julio Urias or Clayton Kershaw.

Covid-19 test delays impacting multiple teams

Covid-19 test delays
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Covid-19 test delays — and at least one incident in which testers simply didn’t show up at all — have delayed workouts for at least two teams so far. And at least one team’s general manager is hopping mad about it.

Alex Coffey of The Athletic reported overnight that the Oakland Athletics have yet to have a full squad workout because of COVID-19 test delays. They were supposed to begin such workouts yesterday, but delayed them until today. They have since been delayed again until tonight, and even those may not happen.

Why? Because the initial team tests that are required before allowing the team’s full complement of players and coaches into the facility had not even arrived at MLB’s testing center in Utah as of last night. Indeed, they sat in the San Francisco airport all weekend because no one with MLB or the league’s testing company bothered to account for the Fourth of July holiday and expedite shipping.

Coffey obtained the text message Athletics’ GM David Forst sent to the entire club about the COVID-19 test delays. And, frankly, it’s gobsmacking.

The upshot, as Forst explains in the text, is that the test samples which were collected on Friday and which were due to be in Salt Lake City on Saturday sat at the San Francisco airport because of the July 4 holiday. Which, OK, fine, in which case someone should have changed the shipping instructions for Sunday delivery rather than have it just wait around until Monday like any other package. But no one bothered to do that. Forst, in the text:

On top of screwing up the logistics of this whole thing, neither MLB nor CDT (the company that collects the samples) communicated any of this to us until we pressed them for information, at which point all they could do was apologize, which frankly doesn’t really do much for us. Our best shot is to schedule a workout for [Monday] night with the hope that the samples arrive at the lab on time tomorrow and they are able to turn around your results in a matter of a few hours.

Forst goes on to say that the blame for the COVID-19 test delays “lies with CDT and MLB and I won’t cover for them like I did earlier today.”

The “covering for them” refers to comments Forst made to the media after the initial delay in testing, which he and manager Bob Melvin blew off as a routine delay, with Forst saying “We all know that being flexible and adjusting to the unknowns is going to be part of everything we do this season.” In the text, however, Forst is clearly pissed off:

Despite having our schedule a week ahead of time, they didn’t alert us to the possibility of any complications around July 4th, and once there were issues, they did nothing to communicate that to us or remedy the situation until Nick (Paparesta, the A’s head athletic trainer) and I forced the issue at various times today. If possible, I’m as frustrated and pissed as you are (well, probably not as pissed as Matt is), and I assure you the rest of the staff is as well.” 

“Matt” refers to A’s third baseman Matt Chapman, who expressed his anger at the COVID-19 test delays to Forst. He’s not the only A’s player to be upset about this:

This anger is not merely about delays to workouts which, given how compacted training camp and the season is, matter a great deal and put the A’s at a competitive disadvantage to teams who are already playing simulated games. It also poses health and safety concerns.

Pitchers and catchers have been allowed to report already and without the test results they have no idea if COVID-19 is spreading in the clubhouse or if any of them need to be isolated. Diekman has specific reason to be concerned as his history of ulcerative colitis, which caused him to have part of his colon removed a few years back, puts him in the “at risk” category. The A’s, now, get to sit around most of today waiting for testing results that, per Coffey’s report, likely, at best, arrived at the Utah testing facility after 1AM this morning.

And the MLB Covid-19 test delays, it seems, are not limited to the Oakland Athletics. Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that down in Anaheim, the testers who conduct saliva tests for the Los Angeles Angels simply did not show up as scheduled yesterday. Rosenthal says that it led to Angels players conducting their own tests. He said that it was unclear if the tests were shipped to lab in Utah — the AWOL testers are supposed to do that — but he does note that today’s workouts were pushed back from 9 am to noon, most likely to account for the testing screwup.

Rosenthal says “two other, unidentified teams had same issue on Sunday,” which suggests as many as four teams, including the Athletics and Angels, are experiencing COVID-19 test delays.

This, to say the least, is inexcusable. Major League Baseball has based its entire, radical 2020 season structure on extensive health and safety protocols and an extensive COVID-19 testing regime. There is already concern on the part of some that, even with such protocols and testing, playing the 2020 season is too risky, but it’s undeniable that there is zero way for professional sports to be conducted in a pandemic without such protocols or with material COVID-19 test delays.

Mere days into the endeavor, however, we have all of this.