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Rangers’ miscues to blame for ALDS Game 1 loss to the Blue Jays

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Though it’s no surprise to see double digit runs next to the Blue Jays’ logo in the score bug of any TV broadcast, it was rather interesting how the Jays came about those runs as the Rangers lost 10-1 on Thursday evening in Game 1 of the ALDS. The Jays registered third in the AL in home runs for the 2016 regular season, but truly didn’t need that power to beat the Rangers.

If the Jays are looking for someone or something to thank for Thursday’s win, it’s the Rangers’ sloppy defense and mental miscues. It began in the third inning. Facing Josh Donaldson with Ezequiel Carrera on first base, starter Cole Hamels uncorked a wild pitch, moving Carrera to second. Then the normally sure-handed Adrian Beltre couldn’t snag a Donaldson line drive for the final out of the frame. Instead, it caromed off of his glove into left field, allowing the Jays’ first run to score. The next batter, Edwin Encarnacion, hit a weak liner back to Hamels but the lefty couldn’t snag that one either as the ball instead dribbled out to Elvis Andrus at shortstop. Jose Bautista promptly brought another run home with a single.

After Hamels walked Russell Martin, the Rangers’ biggest miscue happened. With the bases loaded, Troy Tulowitzki slammed a 92 MPH fastball out to right-center field. It appeared that center fielder Ian Desmond had a beat on it, but as he approached the wall, he slowed up and the ball dropped in for a bases-clearing triple. Desmond is a shortstop by trade, but he played the entire regular season in center for the Rangers. It’s a play he has to make, especially in the postseason. Hamels finally got Kevin Pillar to ground out to end the inning.

The beatdown continued in the fourth inning as Melvin Upton, Jr. led off with a solo homer to right field. After Carrera flied out, Devon Travis hit a grounder to shortstop that appeared to be a routine 6-3 out, but Andrus threw wide of first base, pulling Mitch Moreland off the bag. Facing Donaldson, Hamels threw a fastball that catcher Jonathan Lucroy couldn’t handle and that moved Travis to second base. Donaldson then sent a soft liner to right field to bring Travis home.

Along with the handful of defensive miscues, Hamels’ mental unraveling was a big factor in the Rangers’ loss. As a Phillies fan, I had the pleasure of watching Hamels pitch in Philadelphia from 2006-15. For as good as he was, Hamels was prone to getting tilted. “Tilted,” for those not familiar, is a poker term that means letting unfortunate results affect your mentality, making you play worse from that point forward. If an umpire’s strike zone was too small, if a Phillies defender made a bad play, if Hamels couldn’t hit his spots… he would devolve, becoming increasingly stubborn as if he needed to fit a square peg into a round hole. Longtime catcher Carlos Ruiz and/or the pitching coach would have to come out to the mound to get Hamels back on track but it rarely ever worked. Hamels’ biggest enemy is himself and that was on display for everyone to see on Thursday.

As the Blue Jays showed last year, losing the first game of a best-of-five series isn’t necessarily a death knell for a team’s playoff hopes. But it’s just one more hurdle that the Rangers need to clear if they are to advance to the ALCS. They certainly can’t afford to have any more sloppy games like Thursday’s.

Tigers sign Austin Romine to one-year, $4.1 million deal

Austin Romine
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The Tigers and free agent catcher Austin Romine have agreed to a one-year contract, Chris McCosky of the Detroit News reports. WFAN’s Sweeny Murti specifies that the deal is for $4.1 million.

Romine, 31, has been in the league for eight seasons, all with the Yankees. Across 1,116 trips to the plate, he has hit .239/.281/.366. However, Romine is well-regarded for his defense and game-calling abilities.

Romine will slot in as the full-time catcher for the rebuilding Tigers. They’ll have Jake Rogers and Grayson Greiner behind him.