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AL MVP race shaping up much better for Mike Trout

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A month ago, there were two very strong alternatives for voters to turn to in denying Mike Trout his second AL MVP award. Recent weeks, though, have not been so kind to Jose Altuve and Josh Donaldson.

Altuve, whose batting title seemed assured in mid-August, is hitting .195/.232/.390 over his last 19 games. His average has slipped from .366 on Aug. 20 to .340 now, and his OPS has dropped 50 points to .950. Meanwhile, his Astros have turned into major long shots in the wild card chase after a 4-8 start to September.

Donaldson was out of the lineup for a third straight game Wednesday and is undergoing an MRI on his right hip. Before taking a seat, Donaldson was hitless in his previous seven games, taking his OPS from .985 to .952.

Mookie Betts has overtaken both Altuve and Donaldson for second place in the AL in rWAR. Here’s the current breakdown:

9.3 – Trout
7.9 – Betts
7.5 – Altuve
6.6 – Donaldson
6.6 – Manny Machado
6.5 – Brian Dozier
6.5 – Kyle Seager

Betts might actually be the strongest alternative to Trout if the Astros fail to make the playoffs. Still, how are writers really going to justify voting for him? Trout has a higher average, a higher OBP by a whopping 80 points and a higher slugging percentage while playing the more difficult position and hitting in a much tougher ballpark for hitters than Betts does. Yes, one has done it in the pressure of the race, but does anyone believe Trout is ill-equipped to play meaningful September games? Does anyone really think the Red Sox are better off today with Betts than they would be with Trout?

It probably doesn’t hurt Trout, either, that David Ortiz, the AL’s best hitter this year, could cut into Betts’ support somewhat. Any division on the clear No. 1 alternative to Trout makes it more likely that he’ll get the award. If Altuve finishes up with a .350 average and the Astros sneak into the wild card, then he could be the favorite. If Donaldson or Betts goes on a major tear for a postseason team during the final two weeks, then that might just be enough. As is, though, it’s going to be difficult to deny Trout the hardware.

The Yankees and Red Sox will play on artificial turf in London

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Major League Baseball wants to give the United Kingdom a taste of America’s past time when the Yankees and Red Sox visit next month. Based on the playing surface they’re going to use, however, they may as well have sent the Blue Jays and the Rays:

Major League Baseball has access to Olympic Stadium for 21 days before the games on June 29 and 30, the sport’s first regular-season contests in Europe, and just five days after to clear out. The league concluded that there was not enough time to install real grass.

Starting June 6, gravel will be placed over the covering protecting West Ham’s grass soccer pitch and the running track that is a legacy from the 2012 Olympics. The artificial turf baseball field, similar to modern surfaces used by a few big league clubs, will be installed atop that.

At least they will not use the old-style sliding pits/turf infield that you used to always see. That’ll all be dirt. There are comments in the article about how it’s a cost savings too since they’re going back next year and won’t have to bulldoze and re-grow grass. Aaron Boone and Xander Bogaerts were asked and they don’t seem to care since it’s similar to the surface they play on in Toronto or down in Florida against the Rays.

Still, this is whole deal is not aimed at doing whatever minimally necessary to pull off a ballgame. It’s supposed to be a showcase on a global stage in a world capital. I have no idea how anyone thinks that doing that on a surface baseball has decided is obsolete for baseball playing purposes unless the ballpark is either outdated or in an arid environment is a good idea.

It’s certainly not baseball putting its best foot forward. It could’ve avoided this by choosing a different venue or even building a temporary one like MLB has done on occasion in the past. That, I suppose, would limit the revenue-generation capacity of these games, however, so you know that was off the table in this day and age.

Yankees and Red Sox on turf. What a decision.