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And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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It’s always weird, after the trade deadline, when games actually happen. It’s simultaneously anti-climatic and refreshing if that makes any sense. “Oh yeah, games.” I dunno.

Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Yankees 6, Mets 5: For this I’m going to defer to the Associated Press:

Starlin Castro hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning and the Yankees, after selling off stars at the trade deadline, showed plenty of spunk while rallying past the Mets 6-5 on Monday night in their Subway Series opener.

No. No. We are NOT doing that. We are not, on the first day after the Yankees trade off some veterans, going to cast them as spunky and scrappy underdogs. They do NOT get to be the Evil Empire for 20 years and then immediately transform into the friggin’ Bad News Bears. I will not stand for this. Nor should you. They cannot be spunky until, I dunno, three more high-priced veterans are gone and they lose badly for a year while a couple of prospects emerge. Then, and only then, can they be “spunky.” There are rules, people.

Twins 12, Indians 5: Wunderbar! Max Kepler hit three homers, had four hits in all and drove in six runs. For the Indians, panic time: Danny Salazar was roughed up for six runs in two innings and now will undergo an MRI on his elbow, which he says has been bothering him for some time and has certainly affected his last two starts. In other news, Andrew Miller made his first appearance for Cleveland. He gave up a homer to Joe Mauer. Yankees win the trade?

Royals 3, Rays 0: Danny Duffy had absolutely electric stuff, taking a no-hitter into the 8th inning and setting a team record by striking out 16 batters in the game. Kevin Kiermaier was on deck when Desmond Jennings got the only hit of the game, breaking up the no-no. I had the game on and was prepared to flood the Internet with cat photos if it was Kiermaier who did it. Missed opportunities.

Cubs 5, Marlins 0: Kyle Hendricks pitched a complete game shutout, scattering seven hits. He also threw 123 pitches, which was his highest total of the year, but it was pretty necessary given that the Cubs used every player who wasn’t nailed down the day before. Anthony Rizzo singled, doubled, tripled and reached base five times. Adam Conley of the Marlins  walked six and hit a guy, needing 97 pitches to make it through four innings.

Astros 2, Blue Jays 1: This one went 14 innings and ended when new Blue Jay reliever Scott Feldman came in to face the team who traded him earlier in the day. He immediately gave up a single and a game-ending double and that was that. This should trigger a thorough review of the Blue Jays’ debriefing protocols. If a defector turns out to be a sleeper agent, someone has messed up in counterintelligence. Everyone who watches “The Americans” knows this.

Nationals 14, Diamondbacks 1: I haven’t checked the stats yet, but I am confident that Stephen Strasburg is undefeated when his team scores 14 runs on 19 hits. Three of those hits were his and he drove in a run. He picked up his 15th win of the season. He also leads the NL in WAR for starting pitchers. I feel like Clayton Kershaw still has time to claim his Cy Young Award if he comes back eventually, but if he misses much more time the support is going to shift to Strasburg. Like Woody Allen said, eighty percent of success is showing up.

Red Sox 2, Mariners 1: The M’s took a 1-0 lead into the eighth but it’s not 1968 and 1-0 leads don’t hold up too terribly often. Aaron Hill homered to tie things up that inning and Mookie Betts added a solo shot to give the Sox the lead for good in the top of the ninth. Craig Kimbrel returned for Boston and got the save, though he did allow two baserunners.

Padres 7, Brewers 3: A five-run fifth inning sunk the Brewers and snapped their four game losing streak. Travis Jankowski had three hits and two walks. Padres pitcher Jarred Cosart, making his Padres debut after being traded from Miami, only made it into the fourth after walking six dudes and hitting a guy. It’s not often a starter can do that and not pay for it, but the Brewers couldn’t capitalize. Four Padres relievers took it the rest of the way.

Orioles set new MLB record with 259th home run allowed

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Update (9:04 PM EST): The game went into a rain delay with one out in the bottom of the fifth inning of a 2-2 tie, so the game isn’t official yet. Which means the Orioles aren’t yet the official record holders.

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A third-inning solo home run by Austin Meadows off of Asher Wojciechowski on Thurday night marked the 259th home run Orioles pitching has allowed this season, setting a new major league record, per MASN’s Roch Kubatko. The previous record was held by the 2016 Reds at 258. Willie Adames hit No. 260, a game-tying solo shot in the fifth inning. The Orioles will have 34 more games to add on to their record after tonight.

The Yankees have famously accounted for 61 of the 260 home runs (23.5%) against Orioles pitchers this season. The Red Sox are next at 28 followed by the Twins and Blue Jays at 23 each.

David Hess has accounted for the most home runs on the O’s staff, yielding 28 dingers. Dylan Bundy is next at 25 homers allowed.

The Orioles are not the only team that will pass the 2016 Reds. The Mariners are on pace to allow 275 home runs. The Yankees, 266. Phillies, 262. Angels, 259. Pretty amazing.