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And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

White Sox 3, Red Sox 1: Sox win! This on a Jose Abreu double which plated two in the top of the 10th. Tough, tough no-decision for Boston knuckleballer Steven Wright, who pitched nine innings allowing only five hits and one unearned run. The unearned run, however, came on a passed ball. Pitchers cannot be charged when a run scores on a passed ball, but a knuckler is often a person of interest in passed ball cases.

Indians 7, Rays 4: The Rays held a small lead or at least kept it tied until the eighth but then Francisco Lindor — who was 3-for-4 on the night — hit a solo homer. Four batters later Juan Uribe hit a two run shot. Both homers came off of Erasmo Ramirez. The name Erasmo, which is a regional derivation of “Erasmus,” means “beloved,” by the way. The diminutive of it is “Elmo.” Saint Elmo — also known as Saint Erasmus — was a 4th-century martyr who is the patron saint of sailors. Saint Elmo’s fire is said to be a sign of his protection. Here Erasmo was supposed to protect the Rays chances of winning the game — to serve as a fireman, as it were — yet gave up three runs. Bad relief pitcher performances are often referred to in terms of arson, with it being said that rather than putting the fire out, the pitcher “poured kerosene” on things or what have you. Which is to say that Erasmo Ramirez had quite the ironic night last night, bringing shame to his very name.

Don’t ever let anyone tell you you don’t learn things while spending all day on the Internet.

Tigers 8, Mariners 7: Justin Upton hit a go-ahead homer in the seventh inning, but late leads tend not to hold for Detroit, so he had to go and hit a walkoff homer in the 12th. Upton has had a subpar season overall, but he has definitely come alive in June, hitting .288/.358/.562 with five homers and 20 RBI. In other news, Miguel Cabrera hit a home run that hit the concourse in deep right center at Comerica Park and then bounced onto Adams Avenue which, I can tell you my friends, is FAR. They estimated the distance to the concourse he hit at 461 feet.

Rockies 5, Marlins 3: My ex-wife, who is not a baseball fan, used to like to annoy me by intentionally referring to baseball stuff incorrectly. She used to call players “baseball mans,” uniforms “costumes” and runs “points.” Last night Rockies’ first baseman Mark Reynolds said after the game that “[i]n the heat of the game you’re just trying to score more points than the other team.” I hope he and my ex-wife are very happy together and I wish them nothing but the best in the future. In less important news, Reynolds hit two homers. Between this and Justin Upton’s performance it was a big day for guys who played for the Diamondbacks between 2007 and 2010.

Diamondbacks 3, Phillies 1: Jake Lamb smacked a two-run homer and Shelby Miller returned from the DL looking like a different pitcher (i.e. one who knows what he’s doing), allowing one run and walking only one in six and two-thirds. Pitching against the Phillies would help anyone look good, but definitely an improvement.

Pirates 1, Giants 0: Madison Bumgarner made only one mistake: giving up a solo homer to Erik Kratz. Sometimes you only get one mistake, though, and it turned out Bumgarner’s was the only one that mattered in this game. Jeff Locke allowed no runs in six and two-thirds and the Buccos’ pen took it the rest of the way.

Rangers 4, Orioles 3: A Dante game in that these guys weren’t even supposed to be here today. This being a makeup game from a rainout earlier in the season. Still counts for the Rangers’ seventh win in a row, however. The O’s took an early three-run lead but Texas won by one, as they have the last four contests in which they played. I’ll now go play The Kinks’ “Living on a Thin Line,” which is one of the more underrated Kinks songs out there. Indeed, I think their late period arena rock/Arista Records phase is underrated overall and is due for a critical reevaluation. As Ray Davies — whose birthday it is today, by the way — once said, you didn’t see The Stones, The Who and the Beatles consistently producing new, contemporary and at times excellent work well into the 80s. The Kinks should be given credit for remaining a legitimately working band far longer than the others did rather than trading on their history and nostalgia and stuff.

Cardinals 3, Cubs 2: Jhonny Peralta and Brandon Moss homered and the Cards’ early 3-0 lead held up. Held up for a long time as there was no scoring here after the third inning. People often talk about how cool it would be to have time machines, but they would be disastrous for games like this one. Someone — maybe the Cubs’ bullpen catcher or something — would invariably be sent forward a couple of hours to the end of the game to see what happened. When he came back and said “hey, this was decided after three innings,” why wouldn’t Joe Maddon change his strategy and either forfeit or send out position players to pitch to save his pen for tonight or something? What I’m saying is that time travel would undermine the very basis of competitive sports, which is the uncertainty of outcome. Maybe Joe Maddon would counter with some theoretical talk about timelines and how there is no such thing as predetermination. Maybe I’ll get a press pass for tonight and ask him his thoughts on that.

[Craig gets an email from Major League Baseball permanently and forever denying him press credentials. Craig nods and understands]

Astros 10, Angels 7: Houston had a 7-0 lead after five innings and a 10-2 lead after seven, but this ended up looking closer on the scoreboard anyway. Doug Fister was strong, allowing two runs over seven innings for his eighth win. The Astros haven’t lost one of his starts his last ten times out. Jose Altuve, Jason Castro and Carlos Correa each hit home runs.

Dodgers 4, Nationals 1: Clayton Kershaw is starting to get bored with this league, I think. On a night when he didn’t he have his best stuff and wasn’t working as efficiently as he usually does, he was still basically unstoppable. Seven innings, one run, eight strikeouts, no walks. He’s 11-1 with a 1.57 ERA. In other news Kenley Janson got his 162nd career save, setting the Dodgers all-time saves record. Justin Turner homered. He’s hit five in his last eight games.

Astros claim AL pennant with walk-off win against the Yankees

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Following a rollercoaster performance on Saturday, the Astros clinched the American League Championship Series with a decisive 6-4 walk-off win against the Yankees, claiming their second AL pennant and earning a well-deserved entrance to the World Series.

Both clubs decided to preserve possible Game 7 starters Luis Severino and Gerrit Cole, electing to have a “bullpen day” for a pivotal Game 6. Chad Green took the mound for the Yankees, tossing one inning before handing the ball off to a long line of relievers, while Brad Peacock‘s rare playoff start was capped at 1 2/3 innings. According to ESPN Stats & Info, that made it the first postseason game since 1999 in which neither starting pitcher lasted two innings or longer.

All told, the two clubs utilized a total of 13 pitchers to make it through nine innings. The Astros lost Ryan Pressly to a worrisome knee injury in the third, but were able to lean on José Urquidy for 2 2/3 innings of one-run, five-strikeout ball. Although Yankees’ bullpen fought back in every inning, they had considerable difficulty recovering from Yuli Gurriel‘s three-run homer off of Green in the bottom of the first:

Still, New York managed to get in a couple of knocks as well: first, with Gary Sanchez‘s RBI single in the second inning, then with Gio Urshela‘s 395-foot blast in the fourth inning — the second of his postseason career to date. That wasn’t enough to close the gap, however, and Alex Bregman‘s productive groundout in the sixth helped cushion the Astros’ lead as they headed toward the final few innings of the series.

That lead started to look a little shaky in the ninth. Only three outs away from a ticket to the World Series, Houston closer Roberto Osuna gave up a leadoff single to Urshela, which was quickly followed by a jaw-dropping, full-count, game-tying two-run shot from DJ LeMahieu that barely cleared the right field fence.

With the threat of extra innings and a potential loss looming, the Astros engineered a last-minute rally to regain the lead and stake their claim for the pennant. With two outs and no runners on, George Springer took a five-pitch walk from Aroldis Chapman. In the next at-bat, Houston pinned their hopes on José Altuve — and he didn’t disappoint, lifting a 2-1 slider out to left field for a 406-foot, two-RBI homer that confirmed the Astros’ series win.

The 2019 World Series will mark the third Fall Classic appearance for the Astros and the first for the Nationals. It all begins on Tuesday night.