San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus slams San Diego Padres Over National Anthem Incident

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Last night, before the Dodgers-Padres game at Petco Park, 100 singers from the San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus were assembled on the field in order to sing the National Anthem. They never got the chance, however, because as they prepared to sing the song, a recorded voice of a woman singing the anthem came over the loudspeakers and that version of the song was played instead.

According to the San Diego Gay Men’s Chorus Facebook post on the incident, no effort was made to stop the recording or to start over and no announcement or apology was made explaining what happened. Rather, the singers stood in center field for the song and then were escorted off the field. The post says that the singers were heckled by some fans in the stands who said things like “you sing like a girl.”

The Gay Men’s Chorus characterizes the incident as one which raises “serious questions about homophobia” and followed “several days of troubling comments and behavior within the San Diego Padres organization” leading up to the game. Specifically, they say that “Padres representatives aggressively sought to prevent singers from performing the National Anthem” unless members of the chorus purchased tickets to the game even if they performed and even if they weren’t staying for the game. That demand was rescinded. It’s worth noting that the Gay Men’s Chorus has performed at Petco before Padres games in the past with no incident. The Gay Men’s Chorus has asked for an investigation into what occurred last night.

For their part, the Padres issued a statement on its Twitter account last night:

The Gay Men’s Chorus acknowledges that Mike Dee, President of the Padres, reached out afterward, apologized and offered to meet with the Chorus, which they welcome. It’s clear, however, that the Chorus is still displeased about the incident.

The most likely explanation here is a mixup in the control room, as the statement said, and someone playing an automated Anthem, unaware that a chorus was assembled. Still, it was an unfortunate incident and the optics of it were poor. Here’s hoping some more formal overtures than a Twitter apology take place and that the Chorus is given more respectful treatment at another game at a later date.

MLB’s juiced baseball is juicing Triple-A home run totals too

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There has been considerable evidence amassed over the past year or two that the baseball used by Major League Baseball has a lower aerodynamic profile, leading to less drag, which leads directly to more home runs. If you doubted that at all, get a load of what is happening in Triple-A right now.

The minors have always had different balls than the majors. The MLB ball is made in Costa Rica at a Rawlings facility. The minor league balls are made in China. They use slightly different materials and, by all accounts, the minor league balls do not have the same sort of action and do not travel as far as the big league balls. Before the season, as Baseball America reported, Major League Baseball requested that Triple-A baseball switch to using MLB balls. The reason: uniformity and, one presumes, more accurate analysis of performance at the top level of the minor leagues.

The result, as Baseball America reports today, is a massive uptick in homers in the early going to the Triple-A season:

Last April, Triple-A hitters homered once every 47 plate appearances. As the weather warmed up, so did the home run rate. Over the course of the entire 2018 season, Triple-A hitters homered every 43 plate appearances. So far this year, they are homering every 32 plate appearances. Triple-A hitters are hitting home runs at a rate of 135 percent of last year’s rate.

Again, that’s in the coldest, least-homer friendly month of the season. It’s gonna just get worse. Or better, I guess, if you’re all about the long ball.

Which you had better be, because if they did something to deaden the balls and reduce homers, we’d have the same historically-high strikeout and walk rates but with no homers to provide offense to compensate. At least unless or until hitters changed their approach to become slap hitters or something, but that could take a good while. And may still not be effective given the advances in defense since the last time slap hitting was an important part of the game.

In the meantime, enjoy the dingers, Triple-A fans.