White Sox co-owner Eddie Einhorn dies

Associated Press
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Eddie Einhorn, part owner of the Chicago White Sox, has died at age 80 following complications from a recent stroke.

Einhorn had been out of active management of the Sox for many years, but was still listed as the club’s vice-Chairman. He spent the early part of his career in broadcasting, eventually becoming the head of CBS Sports. He and Jerry Reinsdorf, a law school classmate, purchased a controlling interest in the Sox In 1981. Einhorn played a key role in baseball’s first billion-dollar television contract back in 1983.

Major League Baseball just released this statement regarding Einhorn’s passing:

“All of us at Major League Baseball are deeply saddened by the loss of White Sox Vice Chairman Eddie Einhorn, a leader in the world of sports and broadcasting. He was a sports television pioneer and a huge champion of youth baseball. In recent years he bridged those twin passions through the National Youth Baseball Championships, which appeared on MLB Network and MLB.com.

“A proud and loyal leader of the White Sox owned by his longtime friend Jerry Reinsdorf, Eddie took delight in the franchise’s momentous 2005 World Championship. Most of all, for decades Eddie was a friend to seemingly all in the baseball and the broader sports communities. On behalf of Major League Baseball, I extend my deepest condolences to Eddie’s wife Ann, their daughter – and our former colleague – Jenny, their son Jeff, and their entire family, as well as his countless friends throughout the White Sox organization and our game as a whole.”

Royals fire manager Mike Matheny after 65-97 end to season

Minnesota Twis v Kansas City Royals
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KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Manager Mike Matheny and pitching coach Cal Eldred were fired by the Kansas Cty Royals on Wednesday night, shortly after the struggling franchise finished the season 65-97 with a listless 9-2 loss to the Cleveland Guardians.

The Royals had exercised their option on Matheny’s contract for 2023 during spring training, when the club hoped it was turning the corner from also-ran to contender again. But plagued by poor pitching, struggles from young position players and failed experiments with veterans, the Royals were largely out of playoff contention by the middle of summer.

The disappointing product led owner John Sherman last month to fire longtime front office executive Dayton Moore, the architect of back-to-back American League champions and the 2015 World Series title team. Moore was replaced by one of his longtime understudies, J.J. Picollo, who made the decision to fire Matheny hours after the season ended.

Matheny became the fifth big league manager to be fired this year.

Philadelphia’s Joe Girardi was replaced on June 3 by Rob Thomson, who engineered a miraculous turnaround to get the Phillies into the playoffs as a wild-card team. The Angels replaced Joe Maddon with Phil Nevin four days later, Toronto’s Charlie Montoyo was succeeded by John Schneider on July 13 and the Rangers’ Chris Woodward by Tony Beasley on Aug. 15.

In addition, Miami’s Don Mattingly said late last month that he will not return next season.