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Current ballplayers think a lot of white catchers would make good managers one day

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David Laurila of FanGraphs asked a bunch of major leaguers a really good question: which current players do they think would be or could be future managers?

Laurila asked 20 players and/or managers and they listed 31 different players. Many named a handful. A few — A.J. Ellis and Dustin Pedroia — were listed by multiple respondents. David Ross was named, like, a gabillion times.

The most striking thing about the list: the overwhelming majority of the potential candidates are white guys. A ton of them catchers. The non-white/U.S. players mentioned: Adrian Beltre, Alex Cora, Jose Molina, Henry Blanco, Melky Cabrera (?!) and Russell Martin, who is mixed-race.

Which isn’t to say that anyone here is racist or prejudiced or anything of the sort. The guys the interviewees listed, I am certain, were just those they know well or know well enough to weigh in on their qualifications as managers. Indeed, it’s worth noting here that, with only a couple of exceptions, those asked the question were white too. Given how clubhouses and baseball friendships often break down along racial and ethnic lines themselves, the fact that they named guys like themselves is not shocking or malevolent or anything of the sort. If the 20 interviewees were Latino or black, I’m sure the breakdown would be somewhat different too. If you were asked to name the three people you’d be most likely to ask drive you to the airport, your answers would likely be people of your own race as well. That’s just how informal relationships tend to go in our society.

It’s still nonetheless telling, because a lot of baseball hirings are made on the basis of personal relationships and familiarity too.  Front office people hiring people they know best. The ones with whom they are the most familiar and about whom they are least uncertain on some personal level. But then you remember that front offices themselves are overwhelmingly white. And then you remember that almost every single manager in the game is white too, and you start to realize that it’s not really an accident.

Again, given how so many baseball relationships break down along racial and ethnic lines themselves, it’s not shocking or malevolent or anything. But it’s certainly illustrative of how a certain historical selection of people in power can lead to a perpetuation of similar people being in power, even with the most benign of current intentions. And that, in turn, speaks to how important it is for Major League Baseball to increase diversity up and down organizations so that these patterns will not be perpetuated rather than relying on empty and toothless proclamations like “The Selig Rule” and the like.

Anthony Rendon explains why he didn’t go to the White House

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Today the Angels introduced their newest big star, Anthony Rendon, who just signed a seven-year, $245 million contract to play in Orange County.

And it is Orange County, not Los Angeles, Rendon stressed at the press conference. When asked about the Dodgers, who had also been reported to be courting him, Rendon said he preferred the Angels because, “the Hollywood lifestyle . . . didn’t seem like it would be a fit for us as a family.”

What “the Hollywood Lifestyle” means in that context could mean a lot of things I suppose. It could be about the greater media scrutiny Dodgers players are under compared to Angels players. It could mean that he’d simply prefer to live in Newport Beach than, I dunno, wherever Dodgers players live. Pasadena? Pasadena is more convenient to Dodger Stadium than the beach. Who knows. They never did let Yasiel Puig get that helicopter he wanted, so traffic could’ve been a consideration.

But maybe it’s a subtle allusion to political/cultural stuff. Orange County has trended to the left in some recent elections but it is, historically speaking, a conservative stronghold in Southern California. And, based on something else he said in his press conference, Rendon seems to be pretty conscious of geographical/political matters:

A shoutout to the notion of Texas being Trump country and an askance glance at “the Hollywood Lifestyle” of Los Angeles all in the same press conference. That’s a lot of culture war ground covered in one press conference. So much so that I can’t decide if I should warn Rendon that both Texas and Orange County are trending leftward or if I should tell him to stick to sports.