Remembering Tommy Hanson’s talent

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I know next to nothing of the person Tommy Hanson was, though I’ve never heard anything bad. I can only write about the pitcher who immediately became one of my favorites after bursting onto the scene in 2009.

That pitcher was pretty awesome from day one. Well, day 11 anyway. He didn’t allow a single run in his third, fourth and fifth big-league starts. He opened his career 9-2, with the Braves getting shut out in both of his losses.

Hanson wasn’t always brilliant in those days, but he was a constant threat to bring no-hit stuff to the mound with him. When he had both his slider and his curve working, there was nothing anyone could do against him other than to try to wait him out. It had to have been a helpless feeling for right-handed hitters in particular. Hanson almost looked like he was cracking a whip in his delivery, and he truly did snap off those breaking balls.

Hanson finished third in the NL Rookie of the Year balloting despite his late callup in 2009. The next year, he made 34 starts with a 3.33 ERA.

It was in 2011 that Hanson broke through as an elite pitcher. On June 12, he struck out 14 Astros to improve to 8-4 with a 2.48 ERA. Five days later, he was placed on the DL with shoulder tendinitis. Unfortunately, the Braves let him return to the mound just 11 days afterwards. He was effective for another five weeks (and somehow passed over for the All-Star Game despite being 10-4 with a 2.44 ERA), but then the shoulder shut him down again. Never again would we see peak Tommy Hanson.

Hanson came back and made 31 starts in 2012, but he never had his former velocity. It was impressive enough that he went 13-10 with a 4.48 ERA anyway. Everyone knew he was damaged goods, yet the Angels traded for him the following winter. He made 13 more big-league starts in 2013, posting a 5.42 ERA.

Even though his stuff wasn’t coming back, Hanson never gave up on pitching. He made 10 starts for the White Sox’s Triple-A affiliate in 2014. In 2015, he pitched in the Giants system, amassing a 4.76 ERA in 15 starts.

Hanson was just 29 when he died Monday. What led to his catastrophic organ failure is unclear at this point. Knowing the cause won’t make it any less sad.

It’d be wrong to say Hanson failed to fulfill his potential as a big-league pitcher. He did. His time just didn’t last nearly long enough, neither in MLB nor on Earth.

Gio Gonzalez has a high ankle sprain, will be replaced on the NLCS roster

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It was understandable if you forgot about it given that it happened hours and hours before the end of the game, but Gio Gonzalez left in the second inning of Game 4 of the NLCS after coming down funny on his ankle while fielding a ball in play.

While Gonzalez attempted to stay in the game after that it was clear that he was not right, so the Brewers went to the bullpen. After the game, it was clear why he wasn’t right: Brewers manager Craig Counsell said that Gonzalez had a high ankle sprain and that it was likely he would be replaced on the roster with another pitcher.

This may actually benefit Milwaukee in the very short term given that Milwaukee used six relievers last night, so there will be a fresh arm on staff for Game 5 tonight. It does mean, however, that Gonzalez’ season is over, as a player replaced due to injury in one playoff series is required to sit out the next one. If the Brewers make it to the World Series, Gonzalez will not be available no matter how he is health, wise.

Counsell did not say which pitcher will replace Gonzalez on the roster. We’ll find out for sure later today. Among the possibilities are Chase Anderson, Zach Davies, Jordan Lyles and Matt Albers.