The Giants are now in the real estate business

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We mentioned this Wednesday morning in our little election day roundup, but the San Francisco Giants may have been the biggest winners of anyone when folks went to the polls on November 3.

They won because San Francisco voters approved something called Proposition D, which waived building height restrictions in the area around AT&T Park. An area where the Giants themselves own lease the land, allowing them to go ahead with a real estate development proposal called “Mission Rock,” which will allow for 20+ story high-rises, offices and shopping on land that is now a parking lot. This will make the Giants an awful lot of money, as Giants chairman Larry Baer explains in this article in the Merc.

This shouldn’t be looked at solely as some sort of piggy bank for a baseball team, however. I mean, it is that, but it has a place in the larger context of San Francisco as well. There is an extreme housing crunch going on in the city, caused by dramatically increased population, skyrocketing real estate costs and building and zoning laws that, for years, have made it very difficult to increase the number of housing units in the city. High rise development — which is what you need when you literally run out of land like San Francisco mostly has — is essential, but it’s basically been blocked. This, then, is something of a rare win for folks who want more housing in the city, even if it’s a modest and only a partial win (many other real estate initiatives failed). There is also at least something in here for people who aren’t the Giants: 40 percent of their planned 1,500 housing units in Mission Rock will be below-market-rate housing.

Which, in a place like San Francisco, is desperately needed.

Carlos Martínez underwent ‘small procedure’ on right shoulder

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Cardinals president of baseball operations John Mozeliak confirmed on Sunday, to KMOX/1120 AM and StlToday.com, that pitcher Carlos Martínez underwent a “small procedure” to address discomfort in his right shoulder and encourage healing as well as a platelet-rich plasma injection.

Martínez, 28, began experiencing shoulder issues in 2018 which impacted his ability to pitch deep into games. Upon his return from the injured list in late August that year, the club moved him into the bullpen. He remained in the bullpen for 2019, making his season debut in May, and had a successful year, racking up 24 saves with a 3.17 ERA and a 53/18 K/BB ratio in 48 1/3 innings.

Martínez wants to start again and the Cardinals have said they will afford him the opportunity. He is expected to be on track to participate in spring training as usual.