Mets fans don’t want Yankees fans on their bandwagon

69 Comments

The New York Times has a piece up today in which some Mets fans — interviewed at a sports bar following Tuesday night’s Game 3 win, so you can imagine their state of lucidity — were asked whether it’s cool for Yankees fans to temporarily adopt the Mets as their rooting interest.

One would think that it’d be nice to welcome people on to your bandwagon. The more the merrier, made all the merrier still by the fact that you know they’re just bandwagoners and that you’ve been living and dying with the Mets your whole life. But nah:

At Union Grounds in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, where the Mets’ march to victory blared from three walls of TVs, Jamie Meyer, 31, a film editor, used a drastic metaphor to make his point.

“It’s like postwar Germany,” he said. “ ‘Yes, I was a member of the Nazi Party during the war. But sure, I’ll come over to your house.’ No, you can’t. Some really horrible things have happened.”

That’s certainly a well-reasoned and perspective-laden bit of opinion there from Mr. Meyer. Indeed, it’s exactly like former Nazis wanting to come to your house in 1946. Really, no different at all.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

AP Photo
1 Comment

FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.