Dodgers are already fed up with 6.56 ERA-pitching, excuse-making Mat Latos

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Mat Latos has been awful for the Dodgers since they acquired him from the Marlins on July 30 to bolster the back of the rotation, going 0-2 with a 6.56 ERA in five starts.

Thursday night he lasted just four innings, as manager Don Mattingly gave Latos a quick hook and pinch-hit for him in the fifth frame. Latos gave up two runs in each of the first two innings and a total of eight hits in four innings.

And then afterward when speaking to reporters he made excuses for himself and blamed Mattingly’s quick hook, all in one juicy quote:

It’s hard to get into a rhythm. I kind of settled in, put up two zeros up on the board, found my release point. By the time I do that, I’m already out of the game. … Not being able to get deep in games, being on a quick leash, it’s hard to get into a rhythm whenever you get yanked real fast.

Here’s the thing, though: Mattingly has Latos on a short leash because Latos has done absolutely nothing to warrant not being on a short leash. In addition to a 6.56 ERA in five starts for the Dodgers he had a 4-7 record and 4.48 ERA in 16 starts for the Marlins.

And here’s the other thing: Latos is now on his fourth team in five seasons and everywhere he goes the consensus seems to be that … well, let’s just say he’s not a lot of fun to be around.

Mattingly seems to already be fed up with Latos. When asked after Thursday’s quick hook how much longer Latos will be in the Dodgers’ rotation, the manager replied: “I’m sure it’s something we talk about.”

Maybe things will be different with his fifth team.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

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Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.