The Marlins are going to change everything except their biggest problem this offseason

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This, from the Miami Herald, is not terribly surprising:

The Marlins, under orders from owner Jeffrey Loria, are making sweeping changes to the team’s baseball operations, from player development and scouting, all the way up to the front office.

Whether any of those changes involve [Manager Dan] Jennings, who stepped aside as general manager to assume the manager’s job in May after Mike Redmond was fired, remains to be seen.

Jennings will no doubt be gone. He has been no better than Mike Redmond and, I presume anyway, even he would tell you he’s not the best long-term guy to run the team on the field.

The rest of it just makes me roll my eyes. The Marlins have had a lot of problems over the years, but they’ve actually done a good job developing talent. At least top-end talent like Giancarlo Stanton and Jose Fernandez. Christian Yellich is a nice player any number of teams would like to have come up with. Injuries hurt them a lot this year and last and they haven’t built the sort of depth a team with top star power needs to complement it, but despite payroll limitations and the lack of a desire for a lot of guys to go to Miami, they’ve built an at least credible core.

Loria is a clear problem, dictating roster moves and coaching shakeups from his owner’s box. And perhaps Jennings, who was the GM tasked with putting complementary pieces around Stanton and didn’t do the greatest job around. Jennings will maybe go, but maybe not. Loria is going nowhere of course.

But based on this story, it sounds like they’re going to can a bunch of scouts and cross checkers who, for the most part, have done a fine job for the Marlins over the past few years. Which would be a shame.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.