Report: Giants talking to Red Sox about trade for Alejandro De Aza

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The Giants acquired Marlon Byrd from the Reds earlier this month after Hunter Pence went down with an oblique injury, but FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal reports they aren’t done trying to make some tweaks to their roster.

De Aza really struggled with the Orioles earlier this year, but he’s batting .292 with 18 extra-base hits (including four home runs), 25 RBI, and an .831 OPS in 60 games since joining the Red Sox in June. Boston is understandably running Mookie Betts, Rusney Castillo, and Jackie Bradley, Jr. out there on most days right now, but De Aza could be a useful piece for a contender in a part-time or bench role.

The clock is ticking on the possibility, as the Giants must get a deal done by the end of the day today in order to have De Aza eligible for the postseason. Stay tuned.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.