Marlins might move in and lower the fences at Marlins Park

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Joe Frisaro, the Miami beat writer for MLB.com, has the report

On what is shaping up as a lengthy “to do” list for the Marlins in the offseason will be addressing the dimensions at spacious Marlins Park.

Team president David Samson said on Wednesday that the organization is considering moving in and lowering the fences at one of Major League Baseball’s toughest places to hit home runs.

“We haven’t formulated a final plan,” Samson told MLB.com. “Still looking, but trying to make a decision for next season.”

Marlins Park has some of the longest dimensions in Major League Baseball along with some of the tallest walls. That was somewhat intentional — the Marlins wanted a pitcher-friendly park — but power numbers are down across the league since the stadium was first concepted and they continue to fall. Miami is home to one of the biggest sluggers in the game, Giancarlo Stanton, who signed a 13-year, $325 million deal this past March.

Miami ranks 26th in the majors in homers at home this season. That’s tied with Oakland.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.