Joe Girardi would like Carlos Gomez to “play the game right”

97 Comments

Great moments in Playing the Game the Right Way. During and after last night’s shellacking at the hands of the Astros, Yankees manager Joe Girardi and catcher John Ryan Murphy suggested that Carlos Gomez do just that after Gomez got mad at himself for popping up a pitch.

Girardi:

“I just told him, ‘Play the game the right way. They’re kicking our rear ends. Show a little professionalism to the pitcher. I know you missed a pitch and are frustrated by it, but I just think it’s a little too much.”

Murphy:

“I don’t think there’s any place for that, especially in a 9-0 game,” Murphy said. “He’s an energetic guy. Everybody knows that. We respect him as a baseball player, just, there’s a right way and a wrong way to play the game.”

Gomez being Gomez should not, at this point, be the cause of consternation. But heck, even if it wasn’t Gomez, I still don’t understand the rules about when it’s OK or not OK to be mad at themselves for not doing what they planned. Pitchers have, for years, yelled at the top of their lungs, gestured wildly, sunk to their knees, shouted into their gloves and any number of other things when they’ve given up a homer or failed to make the pitch they want. No one ever says boo to that.

But if a hitter gets mad at himself for not putting a good swing on a pitch, it’s a crisis of ethics. Madison Bumgarner and Chris Carpenter are famous for taking issue with hitters who are disappointed in themselves. The Yankees entire bench last night did too. It makes zero sense.

Play your own damn game. Let Carlos Gomez play his.

[mlbvideo id=”410331583″ width=”600″ height=”336″ /]

 

Brad Ausmus interviewing for Astros manager job

Getty Images
7 Comments

I did the Handsome Managers list in December. Thought I had moved on. Thought I’d never have to think about him again. But here is, walking right back in my door: Brad Ausmus is interviewing for the vacant Astros manager job. So reports Brian McTaggart of MLB.com.

Ausmus played for the Astros longer than he played for any other team in the bigs, notching ten years of service in two stints and playing on the 2005 NL Pennant-winning club. As a manager, you know, that he led the Tigers for four seasons and was the Angels’ skipper last year.

Houston has already interviewed Dusty Baker for the job. They’ll presumably want someone in place before spring training begins in a few weeks.