Brian Cashman has a fart machine

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Last week we linked a teaser to a big S.L. Price story in Sports Illustrated about Yankees general manager Brian Cashman. The takeaway there was stuff about how Cashman told Derek Jeter at point blank range that he’d rather have Troy Tulowitzki as his shortstop than Jeter. Of course this happened in the course of a contract negotiation and, hey, Jeter asked. Cashman just gave him an honest answer.

The full Price story on Cashman is up today. And it’s a good one, talking about how Cashman has survived so long in New York despite the turmoil, the pressure, the self-inflicted wounds and those inflicted by crazy people like Steinbrenner, Levine, A-Rod and God knows who else. Probably the best thing about Cashman I’ve ever read.

If for no other reason than it reveals that Cashman has a fart machine. Like, really. When talking about how Cashman relieves stress and likes to have fun, Price gives us this:

Or, in the final few minutes before first pitch one night in July, Cashman walks outside his office to the corner between suites 45 and 46, near the giant photos of Andy Pettitte being heroic. He backs up to a nearby wall. A cluster of fans wanders by, and he clicks the button on a key-ring-sized remote. The sound is loud, unmistakable: They start and redden and wonder, Who just…? Cashman howls. A woman walks over.

“What’re you doing?” she says.

“Putting my fart machine on,” Cashman says.

He keeps pressing the button. Heads swivel, eyes narrow: Did you…? A small crowd gathers. Jim Leyritz, World Series hero of 1996, big homer in Game 4, back in baseball after years of turmoil, wanders up. The two men talk pitching, but Cashman’s thumb has a job to do.

“I got my fart machine,” he says.

“Is that what that is?” Leyritz says.

“This is my therapy, right here.”

A couple and a child: Gotcha! Cashman scans the hall for the next victim. Is it time? … Now! “Too many burritos!” a man yells.

Hey, some people drink. Some people take pills. If using a fart machine is what makes a tough job work for Cashman, more power to him.

Video: Ronald Acuña Jr. second-youngest to join 30-30 club

Ronald Acuna Jr.
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Braves 21-year-old outfielder Ronald Acuña Jr. nabbed his 30th stolen base of the season on Friday, becoming the second-youngest player in Major League history to produce at least 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases in a single season. Per MLB Stats, the only other player under 22 years old to pull off the feat is Mike Trout, who did so with 30 home runs and 49 stolen bases during his age-20 season in 2012.

Acuña’s triumphant moment came in the eighth inning of Friday’s game against the Mets. He drew a six-pitch walk against righty reliever Seth Lugo, then waited for an opportune moment as Ozzie Albies stepped to the plate. Lugo fired a 93-m.p.h. fastball to Albies for ball no. 2, which was promptly returned to second base by catcher Wilson Ramos. The throw came in high, however; Amed Rosario had to jump to make the catch, allowing Acuña to slide safely into the bag and hit his career mark.

It’s been an eventful season for the All-Star outfielder, whose 36 home runs and 30 stolen bases helps pad a .294/.377/.536 batting line and 5.1 fWAR over 597 plate appearances. Through the first 11 innings of Friday’s contest, he went 0-for-3 with a pair of walks and a stolen base.