Settling the Score: Saturday’s results

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It was another night of explosive offense for the Blue Jays, who pounced all over Angels starter Andrew Heaney and then kept right on rolling through the Anaheim bullpen Saturday night in a 15-3 victory.

Josh Donaldson picked up his 34th home run, 33rd double, and drove in six runs to push his RBI total to 100. The 29-year-old third baseman really is making a charge at Mike Trout for American League MVP.

Toronto is still a half-game behind the Yankees, who got a very good start from rookie Luis Severino on Saturday night to beat the Indians, but there’s no reason to think this Blue Jays attack is going to let up over the next five weeks. Jose Bautista had a two-run triple on Saturday as part of a 3-for-5 showing. Chris Colabello also finished 3-for-5 with two RBI. Edwin Encarnacion drove in three.

Ben Revere even got in on the act with a 2-for-4 and three runs scored.

Your box scores and AP recaps from Saturday …

Indians 2, Yankees 6

Braves 7, Cubs 9

Giants 2, Pirates 3

Twins 3, Orioles 2

Brewers 1, Nationals 6

Rangers 5, Tigers 3

Royals 6, Red Sox 3

Diamondbacks 11, Reds 7

Dodgers 1, Astros 3

Phillies 4, Marlins 2

Mets 14, Rockies 9

Cardinals 0, Padres 8

Blue Jays 15, Angels 3

Rays 5, Athletics 4

White Sox 6, Mariners 3 (10 innings)

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.