The Reds Jason Bourgeois tried to score on an infield fly rule play last night. It didn’t work.

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The low point of a low Reds season happened last night.

In the fifth inning the Reds loaded the bases. Jason Bourgeois was at third base. One out. Jay Bruce was at the plate and popped the ball up on the infield, just to the first base side of the mound. The call: infield fly rule in effect. That means that the batter is out, force plays are not in effect and the fielder doesn’t have to even catch the ball.

So, Royals pitcher Luke Hochevar watched the ball drop in front of him.

And then he watched Bourgeois break from third base. Hochevar thew home, Bourgeois was tagged out for a 1-2 double play and the inning was over:

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If Bourgeois simply stays at third, the Reds are still in business. Bourgeois didn’t talk to the media after the game, but Bryan Price said it was an “instinctual” thing. He must’ve been thinking “ball on the ground, bases loaded, I HAVE to go!” Of course, the entire point of the infield fly rule is to avoid such an impetus and to take the gimme double play away from the team on defense.

Your 2015 Reds, folks.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.