The Red Sox have scored 37 runs in their last two games

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After shellacking the Mariners 15-1 on Friday night, the Red Sox came back out Saturday afternoon and trampled their way to a 22-10 win. Outfielder Jackie Bradley, Jr. went 5-for-6 with three doubles, two home runs, five runs scored, and seven RBI. He’s the first player in Red Sox history with five extra-base hits in a game, per Tim Britton of the Providence Journal. Bradley is the first player with five extra-base hits in a game since Josh Hamilton in 2012. Kelly Shoppach and Shawn Green are the only other players to have accomplished the feat in this millennium.

Seven Red Sox hitters knocked in multiple runs. Six Red Sox hitters had at least three hits. And who started for the Mariners? 2014 AL Cy Young Award runner-up Felix Hernandez. He lasted only 2 1/3 innings, allowing 10 runs on 12 hits (including three home runs) and a walk with two strikeouts. It’s the fourth time this season he has allowed seven-plus runs and he now carries a 3.65 ERA.

Friday and Saturday’s showings add up to 37 runs. It’s particularly poignant since manager John Farrell announced prior to Friday’s game that he has stage 1 lymphoma.

In lighter news, Saturday’s win breaks the “Good Will Hunting Curse”. The Red Sox had been 0-14 on the birthday of Ben Affleck, who wrote and acted in the film set in Boston, since it was released in 1997.

Indians designate Carlos Gonzalez for assignment

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The Indians have designated outfielder Carlos Gonzalez for assignment. This comes after Gonzalez batted a mere .210/.282/.276 over 117 plate appearances in Cleveland. That came after he had to settle for a minor league contract with the Indians in mid-March.

A few years ago Gonzalez was a superstar, winning three Gold Gloves, two Silver Slugger Awards, making the All-Star team three times and coming in third in the MVP balloting once upon a time. That was then, however. His most recent good season came in 2016, when he hit .298/.350/.505 with 25 homers and drove in 100. In 2017 and 2018 he combined to hit .232/.269/.334. Between his falloff in production and the fact that his big numbers of the past were heavily supported by playing at Coors Field, it should not be shocking that he couldn’t make it work in Cleveland.

If he wants to continue his career, he’ll no doubt have to take a minor league gig someplace. Otherwise, this could be the end of the line.