There IS crying in baseball. Wilmer Flores hit a walk-off home run!

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There was some confusion on Wednesday when the Mets and Brewers apparently agreed on a deal involving All-Star outfielder Carlos Gomez. The Mets were to get Gomez in exchange for pitcher Zack Wheeler and infielder Wilmer Flores. The news spread like wildfire, and Flores got wind of it during Wednesday’s game against the Padres. He began crying on the field, as he was about to leave the organization he’d been with since he was 16 years old.

And then the trade fell though. Awkward.

When he might have otherwise been in Milwaukee with new teammates, Flores started at second base for the Mets on Friday night and played a rather important role in a win against the Nationals. He broke a scoreless tie in the fourth inning with an RBI single to left field against Gio Gonzalez, the only run the Mets would muster through 10 innings. In the 12th, Flores hit a walk-off solo home run to left-center off of reliever Felipe Rivero.

After the last 48 or so hours Flores has had, you can’t help but feel happy for the guy.

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Flores is batting .251/.283/.387 with 11 home runs and 42 RBI on the season.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.