The reason for the collapse of the Brewers-Mets deal? Depends on who you ask.

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It’s becoming quite an interesting morning in the wake of the Carlos Gomez-to-the-Mets deal unraveling.

The initial report last night, which apparently came from the Mets, was that the deal fell apart because of Carlos Gomez’s medicals. The Mets, it seems, were worried about his hip.

This morning, however, the Brewers, as well as Scott Boras, Gomez’s agent, came out firing, claiming that there’s nothing wrong with Gomez:

This, on some level, is semantics. It was widely reported back in June that Gomez had hip problems. He even commented on it himself. This was from the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel:

Carlos Gomez came into Friday 0 for 12 with eight strikeouts against Washington starter Jordan Zimmermann. But the reason he’s out of the lineup for the third consecutive game was a troublesome right hip that’s been bothering him for the past couple weeks.

“I’ve been playing with a wrap around it for the last two weeks,” he said. “I don’t like to (complain) about it, but I haven’t been completely 100 percent. I’d be feeling it running to first base and it got worse, so we stepped back and I’m resting.

“I could play through it, but it’s better to play one or two less days (than make it worse).”

He even had an MRI on it!

Now, some have said the issue was more with his groin, not his hip. And Boras’ use of the term “hip doctor” is curious in that doctors who work on hips are not called “hip doctors,” they’re called “orthopedic surgeons.” If Gomez saw an orthopedist for whatever was ailing him — and something was ailing him — saying that he wasn’t a “hip doctor” may be technically true in some weird corner of the BorasVerse. But it’s also clear that Boras and the Brewers are trying to whitewash the notion of Gomez ever being unhealthy. Both those reports from June and his decreased speed and mobility as reflected in his stolen base and defensive numbers strongly suggest something amiss below his waist, be it his hip or something nearby.

Of course there is more pushback on this:

Plausible! [UPDATE: More details here]. It is the Mets we’re talking about. But it’s also worth noting that the Brewers — who are no doubt Haudricourt’s source here — have a strong incentive to have the deal fall apart for non-medical reasons. Given the Mets’ recent history the money thing is a believable alibi, but their own motivations can’t be discounted either.

What are we left with? Murk, mostly. And perhaps a new medical specialty known as “hip medicine.” Which I’m sure the doctor who saw Gomez was into way before it was cool. You probably never even heard of it.

 

Brown hired as general manager of Houston Astros

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HOUSTON — In joining the World Series champion Houston Astros, new general manager Dana Brown’s goal is to keep the team at the top of the league.

“I’m coming to a winning team and a big part of what I want to do is sustain the winning long term,” he said. “We want to continue to build, continue to sign good players, continue to develop players and continue the winning success.”

Brown was hired by the Astros on Thursday, replacing James Click, who was not given a new contract and parted ways with the Astros just days after they won the World Series.

Brown spent the last four seasons as the vice president of scouting for the Atlanta Braves.

“He is very analytic savvy,” Astros’ owner Jim Crane said. “He’s a great talent evaluator based upon what we’ve seen at the Braves, seasoned at player acquisitions, seasoned at player development and retention. They were often able to extend some of their player contracts… he’s got great people skills, excellent communicator and, last but not least, he’s a baseball player and knows baseball in and out and we were very impressed with that.”

The 55-year-old Brown becomes the only Black general manager in the majors and joins manager Dusty Baker to form just the second pairing of a Black manager and general manager in MLB history. The first was general manager Ken Williams and manager Jerry Manuel with the White Sox.

Brown said he interviewed for GM jobs with the Mets and Mariners in the past and that MLB commissioner Rob Manfred told him to stay positive and that his time to be a general manager would come.

“It’s pretty special,” he said. “We understand that there are a lot of qualified African Americans in the game that know baseball and that could be a big part of an organization and leading organization in baseball operations. So at the end of the day, I think it’s good for our sport to have diversity and I’m really excited for this opportunity.”

Crane was asked about having the league’s only Black general manager.

“Certainly, we are very focused on diversity with the Astros,” he said. “It’s a plus, but the guy’s extremely qualified and he’ll do a great job. It’s nice to see a man like Dana get the job and he earned the job. He’s got the qualifications. He’s ready to go.”

Brown doesn’t have a lot of connections to the Astros, but does have some ties. He played baseball at Seton Hall with Hall of Famer Craig Biggio, who spent his entire career with the Astros and serves as special assistant to the general manager. He played against fellow Hall of Famer and special assistant to the general manager Jeff Bagwell in the Cape Cod league during a short minor league career.

Brown said he spoke to both of them before taking the job and also chatted with Baker, whom he’s know for some time.

“Dusty is old school, he cuts it straight and I like it,” Brown said. “And so that means I can cut it straight with him.”

Brown worked for the Blue Jays from 2010-18 as a special assistant to the general manager. From 2001-09 he worked as director of scouting for the Nationals/Expos. He began his career with the Pittsburgh Pirates, where he spent eight years as their area scouting supervisor and East coast cross checker.

Click had served as Houston’s general manager since joining the team before the 2020 season from the Tampa Bay Rays.

Brown, who has been part of drafting a number of big-name players like Stephen Strasburg, Ryan Zimmerman and last season’s National League rookie of the year Michael Harris, is ready to show Crane that bringing him to Houston was the right choice.

“Baseball is all I know, it’s my entire life,” he said. “So I want to empty myself into this city, the Astro fans and let Jim Crane know that he made a special pick.”