Troy Tulowitzki’s greatness is not a Coors Field creation

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Any hitter would benefit greatly from playing half his games at Coors Field, which is the most hitter-friendly ballpark in modern baseball history and dramatically inflates batting averages and power numbers across the board.

However, the tendency to dismiss a Rockies hitter’s strong overall numbers because half of them were compiled at Coors Field often misses the mark and Troy Tulowitzki is a prime example.

Tulowitzki has benefited tremendously from calling Coors Field home, batting .321 with a .951 OPS there for his career compared to .276 with an .817 OPS on the road. However, even ignoring those amazing home numbers and looking strictly at his still-strong road numbers would leave Tulowitzki as the best-hitting shortstop in baseball.

First, here are the highest OPS totals by a shortstop since 2013:

.929 – Troy Tulowitzki
.798 – Jhonny Peralta
.752 – Jed Lowrie
.738 – Jose Reyes
.735 – Ian Desmond

And now here’s what that list looks like if you separate Tulowitzki’s road numbers from his overall numbers:

.929 – Troy Tulowitzki overall
.832 – Troy Tulowitzki only on the road
.798 – Jhonny Peralta
.752 – Jed Lowrie
.738 – Jose Reyes
.735 – Ian Desmond

Toss in the fact that most hitters tend to fare better at home than on the road and Tulowitzki’s non-Coors Field performance looks even more impressive. He’s the best-hitting shortstop in baseball regardless of whether you want to make adjustments for Coors Field-inflated production or simply ignore his home numbers completely.

He’ll put up huge numbers in Toronto too.

Video: Javier Báez jukes David Freese to avoid tag at first base

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Cubs shortstop Javier Báez pulled off one of the best jukes you’ll see, avoiding the tag from David Freese on a play at first base in the second inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Dodgers. Báez barely made contact with a Kenta Maeda pitch well outside the strike zone, tapping it towards Freese. Báez halted his momentum, juking Freese while he attempted to apply the tag, then dove into first base.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts attempted to argue that Báez went out of the baseline, but the umpires’ no-call stood and Báez had himself a single. He would end up stranded on base, unfortunately for him and the Cubs.