Pirates reunite with Aramis Ramirez, acquire third baseman from Brewers

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Via our own Craig Calcaterra–who took off early today to see “Ant Man” and is still breaking news–the Pirates have acquired third baseman Aramis Ramirez from the Brewers.

Ramirez began his career in Pittsburgh, debuting in 1998 as a 20-year-old and playing six seasons for the Pirates. He returns at age 37 with the hopes of putting together a good second half before potentially retiring after the season.

Ramirez was long one of the best, most underrated right-handed hitters in baseball, but he’s hit just .247 with 11 homers and a .725 OPS in 81 games this season. Of course, even that modest production would help the Pirates with infielders Jordy Mercer and Josh Harrison on the disabled list.

In exchange for Ramirez the Brewers receive minor leaguer Yhonathan Barrios, a 23-year-old converted infielder now pitching at Triple-A as a reliever with modest success.

I hope Calcaterra bought himself a large popcorn with extra butter or something.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.