Benches clear in San Diego thanks to a Padres pitcher throwing his gum at Hector Sanchez

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Some serious “Play The Game The Right Way Theatre” going on in San Diego last night, as benches cleared in the ninth inning of the Giants win over the Padres. The reason? These two teams like to throw gum at each other.

You may recall that, earlier this season, Giants outfielder Angel Pagan angered the Padres when he flicked his gum in the direction of Derek Norris. This time the gum went the other direction.

Hector Sanchez hit a grand slam in the sixth inning. He flipped his bat a bit and watched the ball go out as he began his trot. Which, for Pete’s sake, is common enough these days and wasn’t even in the 30th percentile of showboating moves as far as these things go. The Padres pitcher who gave up the bomb, Dale Thayer, however, felt like this was some breach of decorum, apparently, and threw his gum at Sanchez as he trotted toward first base.

Because, clearly, someone who is concerned with decorum is in the right to take his spit-covered gum out of his mouth and throw it at someone. That’s some serious Emily Post crap right there. You can look it up.

In any event, Sanchez later grounded out in the ninth inning, but not before Shawn Kelley threw a couple of inside fastballs at him. Because, again, the proper and reasonable penalty for being happy that you literally did the best thing you can do as a hitter on a baseball field is to send purpose pitches a guy’s way.

As Sanchez walked back to the dugout he exchanged words with Kelley and the benches cleared:

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Just the latest bit of ridiculousness that I’m sure a bunch of ballplayers think is totally appropriate because, of course, there is only one way to play the game. And because for whatever reason, the Padres and the Giants can’t keep the gum in their mouths.

Minor League Baseball accuses MLB of making misleading statements

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Yesterday several members of Congress, calling themselves the “Save Minor League Baseball Task Force,” introduced a resolution saying that Major League Baseball should drop its plan to eliminate the minor league clubs and, rather, maintain the current minor league structure. In response, Major League Baseball issued a statement accusing Minor League Baseball of refusing to negotiate and imploring Congress to prod Minor League Baseball back to the bargaining table.

Only one problem with that: According to Minor League Baseball, it has been at the table. And, in a new statement today, claims that MLB is making knowingly false statements about all of that:

“Minor League Baseball was encouraged by the dialogue in a recent meeting between representatives of Minor League Baseball and Major League Baseball and a commitment by both sides to engage further on February 20. However, Major League Baseball’s claims that Minor League Baseball is not participating in these negotiations in a constructive and productive manner is false. Minor League Baseball has provided Major League Baseball with numerous substantive proposals that would improve the working conditions for Minor League Baseball players by working with MLB to ensure adequate facilities and reasonable travel. Unfortunately, Major League Baseball continues to misrepresent our positions with misleading information in public statements that are not conducive to good faith negotiations.”

I suppose Rob Manfred’s next statement is either going to double down or, alternatively, he’s going to say “wait, you were at the airport Marriott? We thought the meeting was at the downtown Marriott! Oh, so you were at the table. Our bad!”

Minor League Baseball is not merely offering dueling statements, however. A few minutes ago it released a letter it had sent to Rob Manfred six days ago, the entirely of which can be read here.

In the letter, the Minor League Baseball Negotiating Committee said it, “is singularly focused on working with MLB to reach an agreement that will best ensure that baseball remains the National Pastime in communities large and small throughout our
country,” and that to that end it seeks to “set forth with clarity in a letter to you the position of MiLB on the key issues that we must resolve in these negotiations.”

From there the letter goes through the various issues Major League Baseball has put on the table, including the status of the full season and short season leagues and implores MLB not to, as proposed, eliminate the Appalachian League. It blasts MLB’s concept of “The Dream League” — the bucket into which MLB proposed to throw all newly-unaffiliated clubs — as a “seriously flawed concept,” and strongly counters the talking point Major League Baseball has offered about how it allegedly “subsidizes” the minor leagues.

You should read the whole letter. And Rob Manfred should probably stop issuing statements that, it would appear, are easily countered.