White Sox announcer Ed Farmer thinks people need to throw at the Royals

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I’m not sure when it happened — had to be back in the Nixon Administration — but at some point White Sox’ announcer Ed Farmer took a disliking to the Royals. Or at least so it seems.

Farmer, famous for throwing at and injuring Al Cowens and Frank White in a single Rangers-Royals game back in 1979, was in the booth for the White Sox-Royals game on Saturday. His highlights:

  • Saying that if a Royals batter squared to bunt, the pitcher should throw at the batter;
  • Lecturing Eric Hosmer for not playing the game the right way because he showed some excitement at what he thought was a big hit, but which was caught by an infielder; and
  • Saying, after Lorenzo Cain hit a big go-ahead home run and looked into his dugout with excitement, “If I’m on the mound and he does that, next time up when I face him he’s looking at the sky.”

I dunno, Ed. Maybe next time he’s facing you try not to throw him a crap pitch that he can launch?

Anyway, you can see and hear the clips of this latest installment of “Play The Game The Right Way Theatre” over at Royals Review.

Just remember: “Playing the game the right way” = “trying to seriously injure someone out of anger at your own inability to play better than they do.”

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

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2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.