Michael Cuddyer may need to go on the disabled list

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Mets outfielder Michael Cuddyer left Sunday’s game with a leg injury. The official diagnosis is a bone bruise below his knee, Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY reports. He may need to go on the disabled list, but Cuddyer says it won’t be a season-ending injury. ESPN’s Adam Rubin adds that Mets trainers will try one last medicinal fix in an effort to keep him off of the DL.

Cuddyer, 36, has been battling the issue for a while, playing no small part in his disappointing numbers. He entered play Sunday hitting .249/.298/.381 with eight home runs and 30 RBI in 309 plate appearances.

It’s not known yet what the Mets would do to account for an extended absence, but there have already been calls for the club to promote top prospect Michael Conforto. Conforto, 22, was taken by the Mets 10th overall in the first round of the 2014 draft. In 378 PA between Single-A St. Lucie and Double-A Binghamton, he has hit .301/.373/.488 with 12 home runs and 52 RBI.

Carter Stewart will get $7 million over six years to play for the Fukuoka Softbank Hawks

Associated Press
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Yesterday we wrote about Carter Stewart, the American pitcher who, after failing to sign with the Braves last year, went to junior college. Rather than re-enter the draft this year, Stewart has signed with the Fukuoka Softbank Hawks of the Japanese Pacific League.

Jeff Passan of ESPN has the details on that deal: $7 million for six years. That’s five million more than the lowball offer the Braves gave him after drafting him last year and over $2 million more than he would’ve gotten if the Braves had paid him slot last year. This year he was projected to be a second round pick, Passan says, so his slot bonus would’ve been under $2 million.

As Passan notes, though, he has the chance to make out far better than that, though. That’s because his six-year deal would allow the now-19-year-old Stewart to come back to the U.S. as a 25-year-old free agent via the posting system. Passan does some back-of-the-envelope figuring, comparing what he’d make in the U.S. had he stayed vs. the $7 million he’s now guaranteed in Japan:

In a near-optimal scenario, Stewart would receive around $4 million for the next six years — and would not reach free agency until after the 2027 season, when he will be 28. His deal with the Hawks would guarantee Stewart $3 million more and potentially allow him to hit free agency three years earlier.

He could flame out, of course. The Braves’ lowball offer was based on concerns about his wrist. Even without that, there are no guarantees when young arms are involved.

But there is a $7 million guarantee for Stewart now, and the chance to do better than if he had stayed in the U.S. And the opportunity was created, in large part, by Major League Baseball’s clamping down on pay for draft picks and doing whatever it can to extend team control over players via service time manipulation. Stewart, and his agent Scott Boras, are merely exploiting an inefficiency in the market.