UPDATE: Giancarlo Stanton to miss 4-6 weeks with broken hamate bone

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UPDATE: Joe Frisaro of MLB.com reports that Stanton needs surgery for a broken hamate bone and is expected to miss 4-6 weeks. This confirms a report from ESPN’s Tim Kurkjian.

9:30 a.m. ET: Troubling news here for the Marlins, as FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal reports that slugger Giancarlo Stanton has a broken bone in his left hand. Exact details aren’t yet known, but Stanton was set to undergo X-rays after feeling pain in his hand during last night’s game.

According to Joe Frisaro of MLB.com, Stanton said he began feeling discomfort in the sixth inning last night when he swung and missed against Dodgers left-hander Brett Anderson. He could be seen shaking his hand before continuing the at-bat, which ended with a strikeout:

“It’s just pain where I grip the bat,” Stanton said. “I think it just kind of got worse and worse.”

Stanton stayed in the game and struck out again in the ninth inning, this time against right-hander Pedro Baez. He was in obvious pain. You can watch the initial injury and his ninth-inning at-bat below:

[mlbvideo id=”200956183″ width=”560″ height=”315″ /]

You can’t help but be worried about a possible hamate bone injury, which would likely put him out for several weeks. It’s also the kind of injury that is known to sap a player’s power upon their return. Stanton is a ton of fun to watch regardless of your rooting interest. It’s a big loss for baseball in general.

Stanton currently leads the majors with 27 home runs and 67 RBI.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

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Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.