Streak over: A Nationals starter allowed a run for the first time in 48 innings

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Max Scherzer’s bid for a Vander Meer — throwing back-to-back no-hitters — overshadowed another impressive piece of Nationals-related trivia as they prepared to take on the Phillies: the starting rotation’s collective scoreless innings streak.

Joe Ross, on June 19, was the last Nationals starter to yield a run, doing so in the second inning when Pirates outfielder Gregory Polanco hit an RBI single to right field.

Scherzer lost his bid for a perfect game with one out in the sixth inning on a Freddy Galvis double to right field, but he was stranded. In the seventh, Cesar Hernandez led off with a double and eventually came around to score on Domonic Brown’s double to left-center. That ended a streak of 48 consecutive scoreless innings for the Nats’ rotation, as Mark Zuckerman of CSN Washington noted on Twitter:

Here’s what the Nationals’ starting pitching has looked like lately:

  • Joe Ross, June 19 vs. Pirates: 7.1 IP, 6 H, 1 ER, 1 BB, 11 K
  • Max Scherzer, June 20 vs. Pirates: 9 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 0 BB (1 HBP), 10 K
  • Gio Gonzalez, June 21 vs. Pirates: 7 IP, 4 H, 0 R, 2 BB, 4 K
  • Stephen Strasburg, June 23 vs. Braves: 5 IP, 4 H, 0 R, 1 BB, 6 K
  • Jordan Zimmermann, June 24 vs. Braves: 8 IP, 6 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 3 K
  • Doug Fister, June 25 vs. Braves: 7 IP, 4 H, 0 R, 1 BB, 4 K
  • Max Scherzer, June 26 @ Phillies: 8 IP, 5 H, 2 ER, 0 BB, 7 K
  • Total: 51.1 IP, 29 H, 3 ER (0.53 ERA), 5 BB, 45 K

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.