Twins call up prospect Alex Meyer after switch to bullpen

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One month ago the Twins shifted top-100 prospect Alex Meyer from the rotation to the bullpen at Triple-A due to ongoing control problems. And now they’re calling him up for his MLB debut as a reliever.

Meyer thrived in the bullpen, posting a 0.53 ERA and 20/6 K/BB ratio in 17 innings while holding opponents to a .188 batting average. And at 6-foot-9 with a high-90s fastball the former first-round draft pick certainly profiles as a potential late-inning bullpen option.

His control remains an issue, but the Twins are hoping that Meyer focusing on working 1-2 innings at a time will allow him to fully unleash his powerful raw stuff. Glen Perkins has the closer role locked down, but Meyer could supplant Casey Fien and Blaine Boyer as Minnesota’s primary setup man three years after the Twins acquired him from the Nationals in exchange for Denard Span.

Giants CEO Larry Baer likely to be disciplined today

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Steve Berman of The Athletic — known to some as Bay Area Sports Guy – reported overnight that Major League Baseball is likely to hand down discipline to Giants CEO Larry Baer today. Possibly as early as this morning.

As you’ll recall, on March 1, Baer was caught on video having a loud, public argument with his wife during which he tried to rip a cell phone out of her hands, which caused her to tumble off of her chair and to the ground as she screamed “help me!” After a couple of false-start statements in which he seemed to dismiss and diminish the incident, Baer released a second solo statement, apologizing to his wife, children and the Giants organization and saying he would “do whatever it takes to make sure that I never behave in such an inappropriate manner again.”

On March 4, Baer stepped away from the Giants, taking “personal time” and relinquishing his CEO role, at least temporarily. Given Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy, which does not require criminal charges to trigger discipline — and given how bad a look it would be for Major League Baseball not to take any action against Baer when it is certain that it would take action against a player in a similar scenario — it was only a matter of time before the league added to whatever discipline Baer and the Giants had decided to do on their own accord.

At the time of the incident I detailed Major League Baseball’s history of disciplining owners. As discussed in that post, it’s a tricky business, as owners don’t typically rely on salaries from their team and thus it’s hard to distinguish a suspension from a vacation. The examples cited there, however, at least begin to outline the tools at MLB’s disposal in taking action against Baer, and the league has no doubt been thinking about how to approach the matter for the past month.

We’ll see what they came up with some time today.