Settling the Score: Thursday’s results

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Hours after being brought back from the minors, Brewers second baseman Scooter Gennett ended up getting the go-ahead hit last night in a 6-5 win over the Nationals at Miller Park in Milwaukee.

The Nationals actually grabbed an early 5-1 lead on Matt Garza, but the Brewers chipped away against Tanner Roark with two runs in the fourth inning and one in the fifth before Gerardo Parra hit a game-tying solo home run in the seventh. Gennett, who was demoted to Triple-A Colorado Springs last month after batting .154 with a .403 OPS over his first 21 games this season, then hit a go-ahead single off Aaron Barrett in the the eighth before Francisco Rodriguez notched the save.

Everybody keeps waiting for the Nationals to run away and hide in the National League East. While it could still happen, they haven’t lived up to expectations yet. The Nationals have lost 10 out of their last 13 games and currently sit at 31-29 on the year. That puts them a half-game behind the Mets for first place in the National League East. By the way, all five teams in the National League East have a negative run differential. This has been quite the underwhelming lot thus far.

Your Thursday box scores and AP recaps:

Mariners 0, Indians 6

Padres 6, Braves 4 (11 innings)

Rangers 0, Athletics 7

Giants 4, Mets 5

Rockies 0, Marlins 6

Red Sox 5, Orioles 6

Angels 6, Rays 2

Reds 3, Cubs 6

Nationals 5, Brewers 6

Indians designate Carlos Gonzalez for assignment

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The Indians have designated outfielder Carlos Gonzalez for assignment. This comes after Gonzalez batted a mere .210/.282/.276 over 117 plate appearances in Cleveland. That came after he had to settle for a minor league contract with the Indians in mid-March.

A few years ago Gonzalez was a superstar, winning three Gold Gloves, two Silver Slugger Awards, making the All-Star team three times and coming in third in the MVP balloting once upon a time. That was then, however. His most recent good season came in 2016, when he hit .298/.350/.505 with 25 homers and drove in 100. In 2017 and 2018 he combined to hit .232/.269/.334. Between his falloff in production and the fact that his big numbers of the past were heavily supported by playing at Coors Field, it should not be shocking that he couldn’t make it work in Cleveland.

If he wants to continue his career, he’ll no doubt have to take a minor league gig someplace. Otherwise, this could be the end of the line.