2015 MLB Draft: Picks 6-10 – Twins pick college reliever sixth

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No. 6 pick – Twins – Illinois left-hander Tyler Jay

The Twins are going with a guy who has made one start in three years in college. Jay had a 0.60 ERA and a 70/7 K/BB ratio in 60 1/3 innings for Illinois this season. He works in the mid-90s, uses two breaking balls and has the makings of a changeup, so there is plenty of potential as a starter if the Twins choose to use him there. Still, that he hasn’t done it before would only add to the injury risk. It’s possible the Twins will bring him to the majors as a reliever after the All-Star break and then move him to the rotation next year.

No. 7 pick – Red Sox – Arkansas outfielder Andrew Benintendi

Benintendi was one of the draft’s fastest risers after hitting .380/.489/.715 with 19 homers in 221 at-bats for Arkansas. He’s a potential plus defensive center fielder and a left-handed hitter with power in a rather compact 5-foot-10, 170-pound package. He probably won’t move as quickly as the college infielders drafted ahead of him — particularly not with all of the outfielders ahead of him in Boston — but his ceiling is as high as anyone’s.

No. 8 pick – White Sox – Vanderbilt right-hander Carson Fulmer

Factoring in performance and potential, Fulmer appeared to be the top college pitcher available, though two went ahead of him. The White Sox also stumbled into the best college pitcher available last year when Carlos Rodon fell to the third pick. Fulmer lacks ideal size, at 6-foot-0 and 195 pounds, which might have scared off the Rangers and Twins. There’s a good chance he would have been Boston’s pick had the Astros taken Bentintendi. Fulmer was 13-2 with a 1.82 ERA and a 152/46 K/BB ratio in 114 innings for the Commodores this season. He probably won’t move quite as quickly as Rodon, but he could still be one of the first players here to reach the majors.

No. 9 pick – Cubs – Cincinnati outfielder Ian Happ

Happ might offer the greatest offensive potential of the college players picked so far, but he’d also seem to have the least defensive value. He played some second base at Cincinnati, but most expect he’ll end up in left or right. Happ is a switch-hitter with considerable power and on-base ability. He’s another college product likely to move quickly for the Cubs, like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber before him.

No. 10 pick – Phillies – high school shortstop Cornelius Randolph

The Phillies already have an awesome shortstop in 2013 first-rounder J.P Crawford, but that’s not much of an issue here. Randolph offers a very promising left-handed bat, but he’s going to need to move off short. Ideally, he’d go to second base, but third and the outfield are also possibility. The youngest player take in the top 10, Randolph just turned 18 last week. He should show power in time.

Octavio Dotel, Luis Castillo arrested in drug, money laundering investigation

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Five years ago, Octavio Dotel retired following a 15-year career in which he pitched for a then-record 13 different teams. I’m not exactly sure what he’s been up to since then, but I know that today he got arrested, as did former Marlins, Twins and Mets second baseman Luis Castillo.

That’s the report from Héctor Gómez, and from the Dominican Today, each of whom report that the two ex-big leaguers were arrested today in connection with a longstanding money laundering and/or drug investigation focused on one César Peralta. also known as “César the Abuser.” So he sounds fun. Gómez characterizes it as a money laundering thing. Reporter Dionisio Soldevila characterizes it as “drug trafficking charges.” Such charges often go hand-in-hand, of course. I’m sure more details will be come out eventually. For now we have the report of their arrests. According to the Dominican Today, four cars belonging to Dotel were confiscated as well.

Dotel didn’t debut until he was 25, and for his first couple of years with the Mets and Astros he struggled to establish himself as a starter. He was switched full-time to the Houston bullpen at 27, however, and went on to make 724 relief appearances with a 3.32 ERA and a .207 opponents’ batting average while racking up 955 strikeouts in 760 innings. At the time of his retirement his career strikeout rate — 10.8 per nine innings — was the best in the history of baseball for right-handed pitchers with at least 900 innings, edging out Kerry Wood and Pedro Martinez.

Castillo also played 15 seasons, with a career line of .290/.368/.351. He was a three-time All Star and won three Gold Glove awards.