2015 MLB Draft: Picks 19-26 – Pirates, A’s add shortstops

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No. 19 – Pirates – Arizona shortstop Kevin Newman

Newman is never going to offer much power, and he lacks the range to be a plus defensive shortstop, though he might prove adequate there or above average at second base. His calling card is his ability to hit for average, and he could be a No. 2-hitting second baseman for the Pirates down the line.

No. 20 – Athletics – Florida shortstop Richie Martin

Another college shortstop off the board. Of the four taken so far, Martin offers the most defensively, but he has the biggest questions about his bat. He hit just one homer in his first two seasons at Florida before coming through with five this season. Overall, he hit .292/.404/.424 with 20 steals. He’d seem to have a really good chance of becoming a major league regular someday, but it might be as a bottom-of-the-order guy.

No. 21  – Royals – high school right-hander Ashe Russell

This is the first time the Royals have used their first pick on a high school pitcher since they got Zack Greinke sixth overall in 2002. Russell has a moving 92-94 mph fastball and a quality slider, and he has one of the highest ceilings available. He will need to come up with a better changeup.

No. 22 – Tigers – high school right-hander Beau Burrows

Burrows throws in the mid-90s and offers one of the best curveballs in the draft, but control is an issue for him and he probably won’t move very quickly. Both he and Russell are committed to Texas A&M, but they should prove signable.

No. 23 – Cardinals – high school outfielder Nick Plummer

The Cardinals often seem to hit with these picks, so Plummer will get the benefit of the doubt. His stock was higher last year, but he didn’t meet expectations in his senior season. He might prove to be one of the best bats in the draft if he cleans up his swing. Plummer is listed at 5-foot-10 and 200 pounds, but he might last in center field anyway.

No. 24 – Dodgers – Vanderbilt right-hander Walker Buehler

The third Commodore selected, Buehler had a 2.97 ERA and an 81/25 K/BB ratio in 78 2/3 innings as the team’s No. 2 starter. He missed some time early in the year with elbow soreness, but he came back strong enough to remain a first-round option.

No. 25 – Orioles – Florida St. outfielder D.J. Stewart

Stewart is a left-handed-hitting left fielder with on-base ability and power. It’ll be interesting to see if the Orioles alter his exaggerated batting stance in an effort to make him a more consistent power threat. His bat will have to carry him since he’s not going to offer much defensive value.

No. 26 – Angels – Fresno State catcher Taylor Ward

A second catcher went in the first round after all. Aside from maybe 12th pick Josh Naylor, this rates as the biggest surprise of the draft so far. Ward is a quality defensive catcher, but most experts don’t think he’ll hit enough to become a major league regular. The Angels clearly targeted him, so they believe they know something others don’t.

Report: Red Sox sign Kenley Jansen to 2-year, $32 million deal

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports
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SAN DIEGO — Veteran closer Kenley Jansen and the Boston Red Sox have agreed to a two-year, $32 million deal, a person familiar with the deal told The Associated Press.

The person spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because the agreement was pending a physical.

The 35-year-old Jansen went 5-2 with a 3.38 ERA in 64 innings for Atlanta this year. The three-time All-Star led the National League with 41 saves, helping the Braves win the NL East title.

Boston is looking to bounce back after it finished last in the AL East this season with a 78-84 record. The Red Sox went 92-70 in 2021 and lost to Houston in the AL Championship Series.

Jansen spent his first 12 seasons with the Los Angeles Dodgers, winning a World Series title in 2020. The right-hander signed a $16 million, one-year contract with Atlanta in March.

Jansen has a 2.46 career ERA. He was an All-Star in 2016-2018.

His 391 career saves are the second-most among active players (behind Craig Kimbrel‘s 394) and eighth all time.