Josh Hamilton is starting in left field and batting fifth for the Rangers today

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Josh Hamilton is making his return to the Rangers today, starting in left field and batting fifth against the Indians in Cleveland.

In returning from both shoulder surgery and relapses in substance abuse it’ll be Hamilton’s first MLB game action since last October and his first start for the Rangers since the 2012 playoffs.

Acquired by the Rangers for a fraction of his remaining contract when the Angels decided to part ways with the former MVP regardless of cost, Hamilton hit .364 with one homer, five doubles, and a .937 OPS in a 12-game minor league rehab assignment at Double-A and Triple-A.

Last time he started in left field and batted fifth for the Rangers? July 27, 2010, when Texas’ lineup also included Michael Young, Vladimir Guerrero, Nelson Cruz, Bengie Molina, and Chris Davis.

Umpire Cory Blaser made two atrocious calls in the top of the 11th inning

Alex Trautwig/MLB Photos via Getty Images
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The Astros walked off 3-2 winners in the bottom of the 11th inning of ALCS Game 2 against the Yankees. Carlos Correa struck the winning blow, sending a first-pitch fastball from J.A. Happ over the fence in right field at Minute Maid Park, ending nearly five hours of baseball on Sunday night.

Correa’s heroics were precipitated by two highly questionable calls by home plate umpire Cory Blaser in the top half of the 11th.

Astros reliever Joe Smith walked Edwin Encarnación with two outs, prompting manager A.J. Hinch to bring in Ryan Pressly. Pressly, however, served up a single to left field to Brett Gardner, putting runners on first and second with two outs. Hinch again came out to the mound, this time bringing Josh James to face power-hitting catcher Gary Sánchez.

James and Sánchez had an epic battle. Sánchez fell behind 0-2 on a couple of foul balls, proceeded to foul off five of the next six pitches. On the ninth pitch of the at-bat, Sánchez appeared to swing and miss at an 87 MPH slider in the dirt for strike three and the final out of the inning. However, Blaser ruled that Sánchez tipped the ball, extending the at-bat. Replays showed clearly that Sánchez did not make contact at all with the pitch. James then threw a 99 MPH fastball several inches off the plate outside that Blaser called for strike three. Sánchez, who shouldn’t have seen a 10th pitch, was upset at what appeared to be a make-up call.

The rest, as they say, is history. One pitch later, the Astros evened up the ALCS at one game apiece. Obviously, Blaser’s mistakes in a way cancel each other out, and neither of them caused Happ to throw a poorly located fastball to Correa. It is postseason baseball, however, and umpires are as much under the microscope as the players and managers. Those were two particularly atrocious judgments by Blaser.