Lack of interest in youth baseball among blacks has a lot to do with money

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Yesterday, in that “Baseball is boring” post, I said as an aside that there were other, better reasons why kids are steering away from baseball than its no-fun culture. I will grant that, yes, there is likely some element of that involved, but there are probably more substantive reasons as well.

Economics is the one I’ve been hung up on for a few years now. The expense of youth baseball played at a high level initially. The fact that playing pickup baseball just isn’t the same as pickup basketball and that if you want to develop the skills you’ll need to turn scouts’ heads as a teenager, money matters. Andrew McCutchen said as much in a recent editorial. It’s been talked about for a long time and has spurred Major League Baseball’s recent “One Baseball” initiative.

This story from the News-Journal underscores that as well. The culture of baseball is given a mention way down the page, but first and foremost is this:

In Division I, FBS football programs are allowed to award 85 scholarships. Basketball teams are allowed 13 scholarships, for a roster of no more than 15 players. The maximum number of baseball scholarships is 11.7, for rosters of more than 30 players.

And because of budget constraints, many Division I baseball programs aren’t even able to offer 11.7 scholarships. So no college baseball player receives a “full ride.”

“I can go play football and get a full scholarship,” Delaware State University baseball coach J.P. Blandin said. “In baseball, a good scholarship offer is 50 percent. A lot of the big schools give 25 percent or 33 percent.”

That, and a mention of how playing basketball is, basically, free.

So, yes, culture matters to some degree. But like most things, it has an awful lot to do with money.

Joe Kelly’s suspension reduced to 5 games on appeal

Joe Kelly suspended eight
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LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles Dodgers reliever Joe Kelly had his suspension for throwing pitches near the heads of Houston hitters reduced to five games on appeal.

Kelly was originally penalized eight games by Major League Baseball on July 29, a day after throwing a 96 mph fastball near the head of Houston’s Alex Bregman and two curveballs that brushed back Carlos Correa.

The Dodgers on Wednesday confirmed the reduced penalty.

Kelly went on the 10-day injured list retroactive to last Sunday with right shoulder inflammation. He will serve his suspension when he returns.

After striking out Corea, Kelly curled his lip into a pouting expression and exchanged words with the shortstop.

Benches cleared after Kelly’s actions during the sixth inning of Los Angeles’ 5-2 win at Houston in the teams’ first meeting since it was revealed the Astros stole signs en route to a 2017 World Series title over the Dodgers.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts served his one-game suspension the same day the penalty was handed down. Astros manager Dusty Baker was fined an undisclosed amount.

Kelly denied that he purposely threw at the Astros. He has previously been suspended in his career for throwing at a batter.

The penalties were imposed by former pitcher Chris Young, MLB’s senior vice president of baseball operations, who issued his first ruling since taking over the job from Joe Torre.