Alex Cobb undergoes Tommy John surgery

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According to Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times, the Rays announced that right-hander Alex Cobb underwent successful Tommy John surgery on his right elbow today.

The surgery was performed by Dr. James Andrews. Cobb was initially diagnosed with forearm tendinitis in March, but he suffered a full tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow while rehabbing the injury. He was given a platelet-rich plasma injection in hopes of avoiding surgery, but his season is now officially over and he’ll likely be out of the mix until late in the 2016 season.

Drew Smyly was diagnosed with a torn labrum in his left shoulder earlier this week and could also need season-ending surgery, so these losses are going to be very tough for the Rays to overcome. Matt Moore is nearing a minor league rehab assignment as he makes his way back from Tommy John surgery, but command is often the last thing to return and he averaged 4.3 BB/9 in the majors prior to the procedure.

On a night full of letdowns, Yankees’ defense let them down the most

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Game 4 of the ALCS was a gigantic letdown for the Yankees for myriad reasons. They lost, first and foremost, 8-3 to the Astros to fall behind three games to one. Their fans continued to act boorishly. CC Sabathia exited with an injury, likely the final time he’ll pitch in his career. The offense went 0-for-7 with runners in scoring position.

The biggest letdown of the night, though, was the Yankees’ defense. They committed four errors, their highest total in a postseason game since committing five errors in Game 2 of the 1976 ALCS.

Make no mistake: the two three-run home runs hit by George Springer and Carlos Correa, given up by Masahiro and Chad Green respectively, were the big blows in the game. But the errors contributed to the loss and were downright demoralizing.

The first error came at the start of the top of the sixth inning, when Alex Bregman hit a cue shot to first baseman DJ LeMahieu. LeMahieu couldn’t read the bounce and the ball clanked off of his knee, allowing Bregman to reach safely. He would score later in the inning on Correa’s blast.

The Yankees committed two errors in the top of the eighth, leading to a run. Yuli Gurriel hit another grounder to LeMahieu, which he couldn’t handle. That not only allowed Gurriel to reach safely, but Bregman — who led off with a double — moved to third base. He would score when second baseman Gleyber Torres couldn’t handle a Yordan Álvarez grounder.

Error number four occurred when Altuve hit a grounder to Torres to lead off the top of the ninth. The ball skipped right under his glove. Facing Michael Brantley, Jonathan Loaisiga uncorked a wild pitch which advanced Altuve to second base. Brantley followed up with a line drive single to left field, plating Altuve for another run. Loaisiga would throw another wild pitch facing Bregman but that one didn’t come back to haunt him.

The Yankees can’t control injuries, the behavior of their fans, or how good the Astros’ pitching is on any given night. They can control the quality of their defense. On Thursday, it was a farce, and now they’re staring down the barrel of having to win three consecutive games against the Astros to stave off elimination.