Brook Jacoby and umpire Doug Eddings were in a “loud, obscenity-laced, nose-to-nose exchange”

62 Comments

The other day Major League Baseball suspended Blue Jays hitting coach Brook Jacoby for 14 games after he got into a confrontation with umpire Doug Eddings in the tunnel underneath Fenway Park. The details of the confrontation were vague, but there was an argument and the reports said that Jacoby “got physical” with Eddings.

Some more background came out on this last night, with Edwin Encarnacion filling in the media with what he saw. This from John Lott of the National Post:

Edwin Encarnacion says he was there in the Fenway Park tunnel when the fracas erupted, and saw everything: the loud, obscenity-laced, nose-to-nose exchange between hitting coach Brook Jacoby and umpire Doug Eddings.

Encarnacion says that it was heated but that, contrary to reports from the other night, Jacoby did not physically assault Eddings:

“I saw it, but I didn’t see anything that they say,” Encarnacion said in an interview. “They’re saying Brook got the umpire against the wall and put his hand on his neck. I didn’t see that.”

Rather, it seems that any contact between Jacoby and the umpire was “probably incidental,” not intentional as the umpire’s report would have it, and that “Eddings turned, came back aggressively and got in Jacoby’s face.”

It’s not cool to run down an umpire in the tunnel to argue balls and strikes after a game. But it’s also not cool for an umpire to respond to that sort of thing and, as appears to be the case here, amp up the tension in an already tense exchange in an enclosed space. There was no word of any discipline of the umpires in this matter.

Now that we’re hearing more, however, it’ll be interesting to see if, like so many other incidents and transgressions lately, Major League Baseball simply declines to pursue it because the target belongs to a group of folks it has historically been loathe to discipline.

Japanese Baseball to begin June 19

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Japanese League commissioner Atsushi Saito announced that Japan’s professional baseball season will open on June 19. Teams can being practice games on June 2. There will be no fans. Indeed, the league has not yet even begun to seriously discuss a plan for fans to begin attending games, though that may happen eventually.

The season will begin three months after its originally scheduled opening day of March 20. It will be 120 games long. Teams in each six-team league — the Central League and Pacific League — will play 24 games against each league opponent. There will be no interleague play and no all-star game.

The announcement came in the wake of a national state of emergency being lifted for both Tokyo and the island of Hokkaido. The rest of the country emerged from the state of emergency earlier this month. This will allow the Japanese leagues to follow leagues in South Korea and Taiwan which have been playing for several weeks.

In the United States, Major League Baseball is hoping to resume spring training in mid June before launching a shortened regular season in early July. That plan is contingent on the league and the players’ union coming to an agreement on both financial arrangements and safety protocols for a 2020 season. Negotiations on both are ongoing. Major League Baseball will, reportedly, make a formal proposal about player compensation tomorrow.