Red Sox manager John Farrell doesn’t expect Ryan Hanigan back before the All-Star break

4 Comments

Red Sox catcher Ryan Hanigan suffered a fractured finger on his right hand in Friday night’s game against the Yankees, when he was hit on his non-glove hand when he was behind the dish. The injury required surgery, and as a result, manager John Farrell doesn’t expect to get Hanigan back before the All-Star break, per MLB.com’s Ian Browne.

The Red Sox called up catching prospect Blake Swihart for Saturday afternoon’s game with the Yankees. The rookie went 1-for-3 with an infield single and a walk. The Red Sox, however, will still keep their eyes peeled for catching help elsewhere, though Jarrod Saltalamacchia — recently designated for assignment by the Marlins — doesn’t appear to figure into their plans.

Nationals to pay minor leaguers $300 — not $400 — per week through June

Win McNamee/Getty Images
1 Comment

The Athletic’s Britt Ghiroli reports that the Nationals will pay their minor leaguers $300 per week through the end of June. MLB agreed to pay all minor leaguers $400 per week through today, May 31. Many teams have extended that by at least a month. Some, like the Marlins, Padres, and Mariners, have committed to paying their minor leaguers beyond that.

Ghiroli also notes that the Nationals cut more than 30 minor leaguers, as there will almost certainly not be a minor league season this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

It is interesting that the Nationals are only offering $300 per week as opposed to the standard $400 weekly. If we assume that the Nationals’ organization has 275 minor leaguers, they will save $110,000 in August by offering $100 less. The Nationals are coming off of winning a championship. While the Nationals haven’t experienced as much of a boon as other champions due to the unfortunate timing, their owner still has a net worth north of $4 billion. The Nats’ franchise value is approximately $2 billion, per Forbes. No, it’s not all liquid, but $110,000 is change that gets lost between the couch cushions for this and many other franchises.

Players are taking note of which teams take care of their players and other personnel, and which are not. The teams that continued to pay minor leaguers, kept staff paid and on board, and helped in other ways will have a better time going forward of attracting and retaining talent both in terms of players and front office personnel (including scouts). While teams should pay their players out of a sense of morality, there is a competitive advantage to doing so as well.