Red Sox outlast Yankees in 19 innings

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The Red Sox scored in the 16th and 18th innings, but it wasn’t enough. It took them 19 innings and over seven hours to finally finish off the Yankees on Friday night, winning 6-5 after a Mookie Betts sacrifice fly.

While the game ended more than seven hours after it started, technically, it lasted 6:49; there was a 16-minute delay after a lighting stand went out in the 10th. By time of game, it was the longest contest in Red Sox history and second longest for the Yankees.

By number of innings, it was the second longest Red Sox-Yankees marathon. The Yankees beat the Red Sox 4-3 in 20 innings on Aug. 29, 1967. Amazingly enough, that was the second game of a doubleheader.

Tonight’s game featured the Red Sox jumping out to a 3-0 lead against starter Nathan Eovaldi. The Yankees rallied for two in the bottom of the sixth, and then tied it in dramatic fashion in the bottom of the ninth, when Chase Headley homered off Boston’s fill-in closer, Edward Mujica, with two outs in the frame.

That was it for the scoring until David Ortiz homered off Esmil Rogers in the 16th. The Yankees responded when Mark Teixeira took knuckleballer Steven Wright deep in the bottom of the inning.

In the 18th, Pablo Sandoval singled in Dustin Pedroia to make it a 5-4 game. Carlos Beltran then doubled in pinch-runner John Ryan Murphy to tie it back up.

Wright was the winner despite blowing the two leads. He pitched five innings, allowing two runs. He’ll now be sent down to make room for Saturday’s starter, Joe Kelly.

Rogers was offered up as a sacrifice by the Yankees. He threw 35 pitches Thursday, and the team would have preferred to stay away from him entirely tonight. In fact, manager Joe Girardi let Chasen Shreve throw 3 1/3 innings — his long outing since Double-A — before turning to Rogers in the 14th. Rogers went on to pitch 4 2/3 innings and throw 81 pitches. He can’t be optioned out, so the Yankees might well find a reason to put him on the DL before Saturday’s game. After 116 pitches in two days, they probably won’t have to look very hard.

On the offensive side, Pablo Sandoval and Xander Bogaerts had four-hit games for Boston. All four of Bogaerts’ hits came in extras. Mike Napoli, meanwhile, went 0-for-8 with four strikeouts. The Yankees had no one with more than two hits. Carlos Beltran and Didi Gregorius both went 1-for-6 in the contest, even though neither started.

Attempting to complete cycle, Robinson Chirinos thrown out to end game

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With his Astros trailing the Tigers 2-1, catcher Robinson Chirinos began his at-bat in the bottom of the ninth a triple shy of the cycle. He doubled in the second inning, singled in the fourth, and hit a solo homer in the seventh. Yordan Álvarez and Yuli Gurriel both struck out, leaving the Astros’ fate in the hands of Chirinos against Joe Jiménez. After working the count to 2-1, Chirinos slapped an 85 MPH slider to the gap in right-center field. A diving Travis Demeritte could not come up with the ball, but center fielder Harold Castro fired the ball back in to Gordon Beckham, who then made a perfect throw to Dawel Lugo at third base. Chirinos was tagged out for the final out of the game. No triple, no cycle. The Astros lost 2-1.

Chirinos was attempting to become the first Astro to hit for the cycle since Brandon Barnes on July 19, 2013 against the Mariners.

The Astros entered Wednesday’s game as the largest favorite in 15 seasons, according to ESPN’s David Purdum. The Astros were -500 per Caesars Sportsbook. Other sportsbooks had them at -550. So the Tigers’ win was quite the upset.

Justin Verlander went the distance in the loss. The only blemishes on his line were solo homers to Ronny Rodríguez in the fifth and John Hicks in the ninth. They were the only hits he allowed while walking none and striking out 11.