Source: Josh Hamilton’s contract does not have any special provisions regarding substance abuse

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Earlier this evening Angels owner Arte Moreno told Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times that the Angels have language in Josh Hamilton’s contract regarding a drug relapse and the club may try to enforce it, suggesting that they’ll claw back money, void his deal or something in that vein.

I’m not sure what Moreno is on about here, but I spoke with a source familiar with Josh Hamilton’s contract this evening who tells me that Hamilton’s contract has language regarding substance abuse that is no different than that contained in Albert Pujols’ deal, Mike Trout’s deal and every other Angels’ player’s deal. Specifically, boilerplate about banned substances that are all subservient to that which is contained in the Joint Drug Agreement and Collective Bargaining Agreement. There are no special riders or provisions specific to Josh Hamilton or his drug history. To the extent Moreno is claiming otherwise, he is wrong.

It’s possible that this boilerplate is giving Moreno hope, but it’s likely no different than the general “good citizen” language in players’ contracts which people sometimes claim would allow a team to void a deal based on off-the-field conduct, but which those inside the game know would never fly with an arbitrator.

Everything coming from the Angels’ camp since the Josh Hamilton news broke has appeared to be nothing short of a public temper tantrum. This appears to be much of the same.

UPDATE: The union says just as much:

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.