Metal detectors at ballparks (which don’t really enhance security) cause delays

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Some ballparks put up metal detectors last year, but this year is the first year of Major League Baseball’s new rule requiring all parks to have them. And, on Opening Day, a predictable side effect:

The new procedure created confusion and long lines at the gates for hundreds of fans who were trying to get inside the venue in time to watch Masahiro Tanaka throw out the first pitch for the Yankees.

Unsurprisingly, many fans were not happy with the delays the metal detectors caused.

“Not good. It’s just out of control,” said Joe Marinaio, of Staten Island, N.Y., as he stood in a long line outside Gate 4. “There’s no organization. It’s just a free for all.”

Though Marinaio, 19, heard about the new security measures via Twitter, he said he didn’t expect to have to wait over an hour just to enter the stadium.

Over time people will get used to this and the lines will be shorter, one assumes. It always seems to happen that way.

But it’s still worth noting that metal detector at the ballpark are nothing more then security theater, with experts saying that they will do nothing to make people safer at ballparks and could, in fact, be counterproductive in this regard. In other news, I am aware of no security dangers inside ballparks — no widespread or systemic incidents of violence, terror or anything else — which made this new rule reasonable and necessary in the first place.

But this is 21st century America where even suggesting that it’s possible to go too far in the name of security is unthinkable. Where, if someone in a position of authority suggested we all dress up in ballet tutus and wear crash helmets 24/7, most people would say “well, security is a good thing, and if doing this saves one life  . . .”

Rockies, Trevor Story agree on two-year, $27.5 million contract

Trevor Story
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ESPN’s Jeff Passan reports that the Rockies and shortstop Trevor Story have come to terms on a two-year, $27.5 million deal, buying out his two remaining years of arbitration eligibility.

Story, 27, and the Rockies did not agree on a salary before the deadline earlier this month. Story filed for $11.5 million while the team countered at $10.75 million. The average annual value of this deal — $13.75 million — puts him a little bit ahead this year and likely a little bit behind next year.

This past season in Colorado, Story hit .294/.363/.554 with 35 home runs, 85 RBI, 111 runs scored, and 23 stolen bases over 656 trips to the plate. He also continued to rank among the game’s best defensive shortstops. Per FanGraphs, Story’s 10.9 Wins Above Replacement over the last two seasons is fifth-best among shortstops (min. 1,000 PA) behind Alex Bregman, Francisco Lindor, Xander Bogaerts, and Marcus Semien.

With third baseman Nolan Arenado likely on his way out via trade, one wonders if the same fate awaits Story at some point over the next two seasons.