Matt Cain diagnosed with a flexor tendon strain after feeling forearm tightness

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UPDATE: It’s being reported that Cain has flexor tendon strain. He will take a few days off but, at the moment anyway, team trainers are optimistic.

8:43 PM: Troubling news here for the defending World Series champion San Francisco Giants…

According to Alex Pavlovic of CSNBayArea.com, Matt Cain was sent for an MRI today after feeling right forearm tightness. Giants manager Bruce Bochy said that he felt the tightness after his most recent Cactus League start. He was scheduled to make his season debut Wednesday against the Diamondbacks, but Pavlovic writes that Tim Lincecum or a minor leaguer would fill in if he’s unable to go.

Cain required season-ending surgery last August to remove bone chips and bone spurs from his elbow. The 30-year-old owns a 4.06 ERA since the start of 2013, which isn’t quite what we’ve been accustomed to over the years. News of forearm tightness isn’t promising as he tries to get back on track.

This isn’t the only issue with the Giants rotation right now. Jake Peavy’s first start will miss his first start with back tightness, so Ryan Vogelsong is set to fill in.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.