Curt Schilling says Clay Buchholz doesn’t want to be an ace

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Death. Taxes. The sun rising in the east. Curt Schilling peddling bullcrap that, coincidentally, serves to bolster his own legend. These are among the few 100% inevitable things in the cosmos.

An example of that last one came yesterday when, in the course of a media conference call, Curt Schilling said that¬†Clay Buchholz doesn’t have what it takes to be a No. 1 starter:

“Well, I don’t think he wants to be one,” Schilling said Wednesday in a conference call to promote ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball. “I think there’s a level of commitment mentally and physically you have to have. You have to have a little bit of a dark side, I think, in the sense that losing has to hurt so bad that you do whatever you can do to make sure it never happens again. Clay is just kind of, ‘Hey, I’m going to pitch today.'”

Pretty classic Schilling in that he cites traits that he himself had and which no one can reasonably dispute and then he asserts that someone else doesn’t have them via mind reading or armchair psychiatry or what have you. As if every top starter for a contending club must be psychologically wired like a Hall of Fame-caliber guy. As if he knows what goes on in Clay Buchholz’s mind.

If you want to say that the Red Sox rotation has questions, say it. Because it does. If you want to say that Clay Buchholz has been an uneven pitcher and it’s not at all certain that he can fulfill his potential in 2015, say that too, because it’s possible. But please, spare me the “he doesn’t want it bad enough” jazz. Especially when your entire basis for saying that is “hey, when I pitched, I did, and that guy ain’t me.”

In other news, Curt Schilling pitched in the majors a mere eight years ago. Imagine how amazing his “these kids just don’t want it bad enough” game will be in another decade or so.