Bruce Bochy hints that Brandon Belt could get some playing time in the outfield

3 Comments

Giants outfielder Angel Pagan hasn’t played in Cactus League exhibitions since last Saturday due to lower back problems. The 33-year-old had back surgery last September and came into spring training with no restrictions, but this latest setback has the Giants concerned.

How concerned? Manager Bruce Bochy is thinking about who could play in the outfield in Pagan’s absence, and one of the options that came up was current first baseman Brandon Belt. Via Andrew Baggarly of the Mercury News:

When the spring began, Giants GM Brian Sabean made a declarative statement: Brandon Belt was a first baseman, period.

But with Hunter Pence’s arm in a cast and Angel Pagan receiving back injections again, it might be time to change the punctuation.

“I wouldn’t say period,” said Giants manager Bruce Bochy on Friday, asked about using Belt to cover a suddenly thin outfield. “More of a comma. It’s currently being discussed. We’ve talked about Brandon. We’ve done it before.”

Belt has played in the outfield before, of course, but hasn’t logged significant time there since 2011. He accrued 27 1/3 defensive innings in left field in 2012, none in ’13, and exactly one inning in right field last year.

If Pagan would be out for any length of time, Gregor Blanco would likely take over in center field. With Hunter Pence out until late April or early May with a broken forearm, right field would be open to Matt Duffy, Adam Duvall, Gary Brown, Juan Perez, and Belt. Then, with first base open, Buster Posey could move out from behind the plate for a little while, which would help his durability over the course of the season.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
Michael Reaves/Getty Images
2 Comments

Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.