Hector Olivera’s camp denies any damage to ulnar collateral ligament

3 Comments

UPDATE: Ben Badler of Baseball America got a stronger response from Olivera’s camp, who said that the report about possible UCL damage in his elbow is “absolutely not true.” Additionally, they say that he has taken for physicals and passed them all.

7:33 p.m. ET: According to Jesse Sanchez of MLB.com, representatives for Hector Olivera “were surprised” to hear about Passan’s report and weren’t aware of any ligament damage in the elbow. They also said that he feels fine. This doesn’t necessarily clear anything up, though.

7:11 p.m. ET: After Yoan Moncada reached a deal with the Red Sox, the next big name Cuban player to sign with an MLB team was expected to be infielder Hector Olivera. However, it’s safe to say that his market just hit a bit of a snag. Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports has the story:

Serious concern exists that Cuban infielder Hector Olivera has a damaged ulnar collateral ligament in his throwing arm, potentially hindering the market for a free agent who many expected to contribute in the major leagues this season, sources told Yahoo Sports.

Olivera, 29, recently underwent physicals for a number of teams in anticipation of Major League Baseball clearing him to sign. The market for Olivera swelled following a strong series of showcases and private workouts in which the right-handed hitter showed the powerful bat that made him a star second baseman in Cuba.

According to Passan, Olivera already has one offer in hand for more than $50 million. However, a damaged UCL and the possibility of Tommy John surgery would almost certainly change things.

Of course, position players don’t need as much time to rehab from Tommy John surgery as pitchers, but it would still likely cost Olivera around 6-9 months. That would rule him out for all of 2015. And this isn’t a young player we are talking about here. He’ll be 30 this April.

Olivera batted some injuries toward the end of his time in Cuba, missing the entire 2012-13 season due to thrombosis in his left biceps, but he has done nothing but hit when healthy. He compiled a .323/.407/.505 batting line over 10 seasons with Asvispas de Santiago in Serie Nacional.

Jim Crane thought the heat over sign-stealing would blow over by spring training

Getty Images
14 Comments

The Astros’ sign-stealing story broke in November, a steady drumbeat of coverage of it lasted through December and into January, when Rob Manfred’s report came out about it. The report was damning and, in its wake, Houston’s manager and general manger were both suspended and then fired.

After that a steady stream of media reports came out which not only made the whole affair seem even worse than Manfred’s report suggested, but which also suggested that, on some level, Major League Baseball had bungled it all and it was even worse than it had first seemed.

Rather than Manfred and the Astros putting this all behind them, the story grew. As it grew, both the Red Sox and Mets fired their managers and, in a few isolated media appearances, Astros’ players seemed ill-prepared for questions on it all. Once spring training began the Astros made even worse public appearances and, for the past week and change, each day has given us a new player or three angrily speaking out about how mad they are at the Astros and how poorly they’ve handled all of this.

Why have they handled it so poorly? As always, look to poor leadership:

Guess not.

In other news, Crane was — and I am not making this up — recently named the Houston Sports Executive of the Year. An award he has totally, totally earned, right?