UPDATE: Hunter Pence out 6-8 weeks with fracture in left forearm

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UPDATE: Alex Pavlovic of CSNBayArea.com brings word that X-rays confirmed a non-displaced fracture in the forearm. Pence will be sidelined for 6-8 weeks, which means that he’ll likely miss the first month of the season.

Losing Pence obviously hurts, but the Giants should be able to get by with their in-house options. Angel Pagan and Nori Aoki will hold down two outfield spots while some combination of Gregor Blanco, Justin Maxwell, Travis Ishikawa, and Juan Perez can fill in.

6:22 p.m. ET: According to Alex Pavlovic of CSNBayArea.com, the Giants believe that Pence suffered a broken left forearm. Not good. We should have a better idea about a timetable after X-rays are completed.

6:09 p.m. ET: Some concerning news here for the defending World Series champion Giants…

According to Alex Pavlovic of CSNBayArea.com, outfielder Hunter Pence is headed for X-rays after he was hit in the hand by a pitch during today’s Cactus League game against the Cubs. Nothing is official yet, but Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle writes that there “seems to be some pessimism” regarding the situation. Uh oh.

Pence has long been regarded as one of the game’s most durable players. He has appeared in all 162 games in back-to-back seasons and has played in at least 154 games dating back to 2008.

Pence, who turns 32 in April, batted .277/.332/.445 with 20 home runs, 74 RBI, and 13 stolen bases last season.

Gabe Kapler chooses not to bench Jean Segura for lack of effort

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The Phillies are in a tailspin. The club lost its perch atop the NL East, losing 12 of its last 18 games dating back to May 30. They enter Thursday night’s action four games behind the now-first-place Braves. The reasons for the slide are myriad, including a rash of injuries, but the players have also simply not played well. Understandably, fans are upset.

It didn’t help when, for the second time in three weeks, shortstop Jean Segura didn’t run hard on a batted ball. On June 3, Segura didn’t run on an infield pop-up that eventually resulted in a season-ending injury to Andrew McCutchen. On Wednesday during the second game of a doubleheader, Segura weakly hit a Max Scherzer pitch to shallow left-center that wasn’t caught. Because he was watching the ball rather than running hard, he had to hold up after a wide turn around first base.

To the surprise of many, Segura wasn’t pulled from the game despite the lack of effort. To the even further surprise of many, manager Gabe Kapler included Segura in Thursday’s lineup against the Nationals, which has otherwise been thoroughly reshuffled. Per Scott Lauber of The Philadelphia Inquirer, Kapler said, “Jean is one of our eight best players. I don’t think taking one of our eight best players and our shortstop out of our lineup is what’s best for the Philadelphia Phillies.”

Kapler said he had a long talk with Segura. “I told him that we’re going to address not just him but other players in the clubhouse and we’re going to talk about the highest level of effort and talk about how we can’t win every night but we can win the game of give-a-[hoot] and be undefeated in that category. Then we can protect the Phillies by putting the best lineup together on a nightly basis and not think about making ourselves feel better by sending a message.”

Kapler hit the nail on the head with that last line. Benching Segura only makes fans and pundits feel better by punishing someone for a perceived transgression. But does it actually teach anything, and is it actually beneficial to the team? Maybe to the former, and no to the latter. Matt Winkelman of Baseball Prospectus brought up a great point on Twitter, writing, “The idea that punishment is the only way to solve a problem or change behavior is such a narrow minded idea.” People learn best in different ways. Some might respond well to punishment. Others may just need a good talking-to. It’s a case-by-case thing. Kapler is right to apply nuance to the situation.

So many of baseball’s long-held beliefs have fallen to the wayside in recent years. The idea that a player must always be punished for a lack of effort will hopefully be the next one to be taken out to the dumpster.