Yankees don’t plan on having to pay A-Rod’s $30 million in home run milestone bonuses

52 Comments

Alex Rodriguez is due $30 million in marketing bonuses from the Yankees for reaching certain milestone markers between career home runs 660 and 763 — 763 being the all-time home run record.

Rodriguez will head into the 2015 season with 654 career jacks, so he’s going to start expecting checks. But the Yankees are ready to fight him on the issue.

Jon Heyman has the story at CBSSports.com …

Yankees people are said to be confident A-Rod wouldn’t prevail in the expected skirmish over the $30 million, not only because of their belief that his drug missteps have rendered his marketing value nil, but also because of the phrasing in the agreement that requires that the Yankees “designate” the historic home runs as milestones. Perhaps even more important, the potential to call him to the stand under oath should he challenge their decision to refuse to pay, as is his right.

Without seeing the exact language in A-Rod’s contract, it’s hard to guess how this will actually play out.

Rodriguez is supposed to get $6 million if he ties Willie Mays (660), $6 million for tying Babe Ruth (714), $6 million more for tying Hank Aaron (755), and another $6 million if he matches Barry Bonds at 762. He would then get $6 million for setting a new all-time home run mark. The 39-year-old third baseman turned designated hitter is under contract with the Yankees for the next three years at a total of $64 million in base salaries.

Video: Cubs score run on Pirates’ appeal throw

Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
Leave a comment

2019 has been one long nightmare for the Pirates. They’re in last place in the NL Central, have had multiple clubhouse fights, and can’t stop getting into bench-clearing incidents. The embarrassment continued on Sunday as the club lost 16-6 to the Cubs, suffering a three-game series sweep in Chicago.

One of those 16 runs the Pirates allowed was particularly noteworthy. In the bottom of the third inning, with the game tied at 5-5, the Cubs had runners on first and second with two outs. Tony Kemp hit a triple to right field, allowing both Ben Zobrist and Jason Heyward to score to make it 7-5. The Pirates thought one of the Cubs’ base runners didn’t touch third base on their way home. Reliever Michael Feliz attempted to make an appeal throw to third base, but it was way too high for Erik González to catch, so Kemp scored easily on the error.

The Pirates lost Friday’s game to the Cubs 17-8 and Saturday’s game 14-1. They were outscored 47-15 in the three-game series. According to Baseball Reference, since 1908, the Pirates never allowed 14+ runs in three consecutive games and only did it two games in a row twice before this series, in 1949 and in 1950. The Cubs scored 14+ in three consecutive games just one other time, in 1930.